Supporting Our Students: Recognizing Student Concerns & Next Steps

On February 28, 2018, Rachel Pickett and Elizabeth Polzin led this excellent session.

More about the program below as well as the PowerPoint slides.

In recent years, college campuses have seen an increase in the amount of students dealing with mental illnesses, stressors and other concerns. Faculty are not expected to act as counselors or solve students’ personal problems; but rather demonstrate Christian concern and refer students to the appropriate services. This Lunch n Learn will provide faculty information on how to recognize various student concerns, review active listening tools, as well as offer resources for faculty and students in navigating these concerns. The main focus of the program will be on discussion of case studies and practicing skills faculty can use in their interactions with students. Counseling center staff, along with the presenters, will provide insight and guidance. Free lunch in the cafeteria for those who register in advance.

PowerPoint slides: PPT Handouts Supporting Students-Mental Health & Other Issues

Elizabeth Polzin

Rachel Pickett

 

Critical Conversations in Curriculum on Tuesday February 27

Between February and July, Bernard Bull will be hosting a monthly event to explore critical conversations in curriculum. This is an opportunity for faculty and academic staff to examine and discuss substantive issues about curriculum. This is not about curriculum as an exercise in compliance.

On February 20, we begin with a shared discussion on foundational questions for the series: What is curriculum? What are dominant viewpoints and philosophies about curriculum in higher education? Is there such a thing as a distinctly Christian and/or Lutheran curriculum? How are beliefs and values manifest in a curriculum, and What are the implications for living out Concordia’s distinct mission?

Readings for The first Critical Conversation in Curriculum
1. Education and the Abolition of Man – http://www.cslewis.com/education-and-the-abolition-of-man/
2. A Faculty and Model of Higher Education for the Lutheran University – https://issues.cune.edu/the-lutheran-faculty-pre-k-through-higher-education/a-faculty-and-model-of-higher-education-for-the-lutheran-university/

Join us for future sessions by registering here: http://celt.cuw.edu/critical-conversations-with-bernard-bull/

Faculty and staff in attendance

Dr. Bernard Bull leading the conversation

Academic Innovation Team with Bernard Bull

February 22, 2018 was the first meeting of the Academic Innovation Team on Augmented and Virtual Reality.

Handout from this session7ThingsAboutAugmentedandVirtualReality

About this program:

During this semester, we are launching the first of what we hope to be several future academic innovation teams. An academic innovation team is a group of faculty and academic staff who gather monthly to focus upon a specific academic innovation, with the ultimate goal of enhancing teaching or pursuing a scholarly project.

Step 1 Learning
This first team will focus upon augmented and virtual reality in the higher education. In our first meetings, we will learn about one another’s goals and interest in this area, and focus upon learning about augmented and virtual reality in education through research articles, demonstrations, guest presenters, and experimenting with some of the technologies.

Step 2 Applying Your Learning
After building a foundation, members of the academic innovation team will choose an individual or group project that seeks to apply augmented and/or virtual reality to a specific lesson, course, or content area. Or, others may choose to engage in a formal scholarly project related to enhancing student learning through augmented and/or virtual reality.

Future meeting dates:
Thursdays: March 22, April 19, June 21, July 19)
2:30 to 4:00pm Central – (CUW-In R006)
3:30 to 5:00pm Eastern – (CUAA-Krieger 103)

Register: http://bit.ly/CUInnovate

Bernard Bull leading this first session:

Link to Bernard Bull blogging about augmented and virtual reality: http://etale.org/main/2018/02/22/the-launch-of-an-academic-innovation-team-on-augmented-virtual-reality-in-the-higher-education-classroom/ 

 

Interdisciplinary Team Teaching Lunch n’ Learn

On Monday February 12, 2018 Susan Mobley and Brian Harries presented this program. Below is more about the program and related handouts.

Teaching with a partner from another discipline carries both rewards and challenges. Hear Drs. Mobley and Harries share on their collaborations across their disciplines in undergraduate teaching. Session will include tips and emerging best practices.  Free lunch from the cafeteria included for those who register in advance.

Collaborative Team Teaching Handout

Critical Conversations with Bernard Bull

Critical Conversations

Bernard Bull will be hosting a monthly event to explore critical conversations in curriculum. This is an opportunity for faculty and academic staff to examine and discuss substantive issues about curriculum. This is not about curriculum as an exercise in compliance. In February, we begin with a shared discussion on foundational questions for the series: What is curriculum? What are dominant viewpoints and philosophies about curriculum in higher education? Is there such a thing as a distinctly Christian and/or Lutheran curriculum? How are beliefs and values manifest in a curriculum, and What are the implications for living out Concordia’s distinct mission? Beverages and snacks will be provided.

All sessions from 3:00-4:30. Dates and registration links below. Specific topics coming soon.

Tuesday February 27: Foundational Questions. (registration closed)
Tuesday March 20: (registration closed)

 

 

Fall 2017 CELT Programs at CUAA

CUAA Fall Faculty Book Group
Three meetings, all in SCI 102: Wednesday September 27, 3:30-4:30; Thursday October 26, 4:00-5:00; Wednesday November 15, 3:30-4:40

Join colleagues for discussion of the book The College Fear Factor: How Students and Professors Misunderstand One Another by Rebecca D. Cox. Book group facilitated by Robert Hill.

About the book: Rebecca D. Cox draws on five years of interviews and observations at community colleges. She shows how students and their instructors misunderstand and ultimately fail one another, despite good intentions. Most memorably, she describes how easily students can feel defeated―by their real-world responsibilities and by the demands of college―and come to conclude that they just don’t belong there after all.

“The College Fear Factor” reveals how the traditional college culture can actually pose obstacles to students’ success, and suggests strategies for effectively explaining academic expectations.

Thursday September 14, 3:45-4:45 in SCI 102
Managing Difficult Conversations in the Classroom
Led by Jeff Schwehm and Glenda Waterman

This is a continuation of the successful session that took place during the May 2017 Faculty Institute.

Tuesday October 3, 4:00-5:00 in SCI 102
Wiki-Working: A Partial, Palatable Flip for the Conventional, Lecture-Based Classroom
Led by Dr. Matt Schumann

Wednesday November 29, 3:30-4:30 in SCI 102
Fall 2017: The Thrill of Victory and the Agony of Defeat

This is a roundtable faculty discussion of what worked—and didn’t—in the classroom. Facilitated by Robert Hill.

Fall 2017 Programs at CUW

CELT Fall Faculty Book Group
Mondays, 2:00 to 3:00pm in R006
4 meetings: September 25, October 16, October 30, November 13
Led by: Sarah Lovern

Join colleagues for discussion of the book “The College Fear Factor: How Students and Professors Misunderstand One Another” by Rebecca D. Cox.

About the book: Rebecca D. Cox draws on five years of interviews and observations at community colleges. She shows how students and their instructors misunderstand and ultimately fail one another, despite good intentions. Most memorably, she describes how easily students can feel defeated―by their real-world responsibilities and by the demands of college―and come to conclude that they just don’t belong there after all.

“The College Fear Factor” reveals how the traditional college culture can actually pose obstacles to students’ success, and suggests strategies for effectively explaining academic expectations.

Faith, Learning and Vocation Book Group
Restoring the Soul of the University: Unifying Christian Higher Education in a Fragmented Age
Wednesdays 12:00-1:00 in R006
3 meetings: September 20, October 18, November 15

Faculty and staff are invited to join Bernard Bull as he leads this book discussion.

About the book: Has the American university gained the whole world but lost its soul? In terms of money, prestige, power, and freedom, American universities appear to have gained the academic world. But at what cost? We live in the age of the fragmented multiversity that has no unifying soul or mission. The multiversity in a post-Christian culture is characterized instead by curricular division, the professionalization of the disciplines, the expansion of administration, the loss of community, and the idolization of athletics. The situation is not hopeless. According to the authors of this book, Perry L. Glanzer, Nathan F. Alleman, and Todd C. Ream, Christian universities can recover their soul―but to do so will require reimagining excellence in a time of exile, placing the liberating arts before the liberal arts, and focusing on the worship, love, and knowledge of God as central to the university. Restoring the Soul of the University is a pioneering work that charts the history of the university and casts an inspiring vision for the future of higher education.

Thursday, August 10, 7:30-8:30 am in the Lakeshore Room
Servant Leader Roundtable

The August meeting’s topic is: Character
“Thoughts become actions, actions become habits, habits become our character, and our character becomes our destiny.” ~ James Hunter

Monday, August 21, 12:00- 1:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Basics (F2F and Webinar)
Susan Gallanis

Log in and basic navigation, add course content, set up grade center, grade assignments, open course to students.

Tuesday, August 22, 12:00- 1:00 pm in R006
Blackboard More Tools (F2F and Webinar)
Justin Frisque

Embed YouTube video, discussion forums, email/course messages, add the Panopto tool.

Wednesday, August 23, 12:00-1:00 pm in LU006 (Media Viewing Room)
Teaching via Video Conference
Susan Gallanis and Justin Frisque

Learn how to use Concordia University’s video conference equipment to connect and teach your course to other Concordia locations as well as best practices for teaching via video conference.

Thursday, August 24, 12:00 – 1:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Assessments & Rubrics (F2F and Webinar)
Justin Frisque

Create an assessment with 5 question types, create a question pool, create a rubric and grade using a rubric.

Friday, August 25, 12:00 -1:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Collaborate (F2f only)
Susan Gallanis

Learn how to navigate and set up Blackboard Collaborate, a web conferencing tool you can use to meet virtually and synchronously with your students, such as for online office hours. You’ll also see how to set up sessions for groups of students to meet without the instructor being present.

Thursday, August 31, 1:00-2:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Motivate, Engage, and Inspire: Tips for Teaching Modern Learners, a Magna Live Webinar
Christy Price, EdD

This webinar provides you with a comprehensive look at the modern learner. Find out what makes Millennials tick, what’s different in how they learn (and why it’s different), and the research data that will help you understand what it all means.

Dr. Price will help you identify the teaching methods that work best for modern learners, including several strategies to better engage and motivate your Millennial students. She’ll focus on what she calls the five new R’s: Research, rationale, relaxed, rapport, and research-based methods. She’ll delve in-depth into each “R” and why each one is critical to helping your modern students succeed.

Read more about the webinar from this link: https://www.magnapubs.com/online-seminars/motivate-engage-and-inspire-tips-for-teaching-modern-learners-14537-1.html 

Wednesday, September 6, 1:00-2:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Basics (F2F and Webinar)
Susan Gallanis

Log in and basic navigation, add course content, set up grade center, grade assignments, open course to students.

Monday, September 11, 1:00-2:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Assessments & Rubrics (F2F and Webinar)
Justin Frisque

Create an assessment with 5 question types, create a question pool, create a rubric and grade using a rubric.

Wednesday September 13, 10:00-11:00 in the Lake Shore Room
Ancillary Research Agreements presented by Attorney Tom Hall

This program is for faculty and staff and brought to you by the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP). This workshop will examine the different types of ancillary research agreements (confidentiality disclosure agreements, research agreements, material transfer agreements, etc.), when and why they are necessary, problematic clauses, and negotiation tips and tricks.

Learning Objectives: Participants will learn when an ancillary agreement may be necessary; become familiar with the differ types of ancillary agreements; learn problematic terms in ancillary research agreements; learn negotiation tips for ancillary agreements

Thursday, September 14, 7:30-8:30 am in the Lakeshore Room
Servant Leader Roundtable

The September meeting’s topic is: Influence vs. Coercion
“If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up the men to gather wood, divide the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea.” ~ Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Thursday, September 14, 12:00-1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Faculty Advising Part 1: The Nuts and Bolts of AdvisingLed by Andy Miller, Director of Academic Advising & Retention

Are you a faculty advisor for Trad UG students? Do we all know what that entails? Join the Academic Advising Office for a Lunch and Learn* where we’ll discuss the role of a faculty advisor and share some helpful tricks of the trade.

*All faculty are welcome to attend, but lunch is provided for faculty advisors only.

Monday, September 18, 12:00-1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room (Lunch n’ Learn)
Who is Luther? Led by Jason Lane

Martin Luther, the most significant figure of the Protestant Reformation, and arguably the most influential figure in Western Church since St. Augustine, remains for so many an enigmatic figure. For some, he is too Catholic. For others, too Protestant. He is too political or not political enough, too conservative or too liberal, too jovial or too depressed. So who is Luther? This Lunch n’ Learn is designed particularly for faculty who want better to understand the life and thought of Martin Luther and, further, to understand from studying Luther why it matters that we are a Lutheran University.Free lunch for Faculty who register in advance. (Up to 20)

Tuesday, September 19, 5:30-6:30pm (webinar only)
Getting Started with Blackboard Collaborate
Susan Gallanis and Susie Stanley

Learn how to navigate and set up Blackboard Collaborate, a web conferencing tool you can use to meet virtually and synchronously with your students, such as for online office hours. You’ll also see how to set up sessions for groups of students to meet without the instructor being present.

Thursday, September 21, 3:00 – 4:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Group Tools (F2F and Webinar)
Susan Gallanis

Learn how to set up groups, use group tools, and create and grade group assignments.

Wednesday, September 27, 1:00- 2:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Aligning Student and Faculty Perceptions of Rigor, a Magna Live Webinar
Lolita Paff, PhD

There is value in exploring student and faculty perceptions about rigor and learning. Teachers can’t dispel student misperceptions if they don’t know about them. The strategies in this seminar help teachers expand students’ concept and definition of learning, get students thinking about how they learn, and promote self-directed learning.
Topics Covered: Defining rigor- student and faculty perspectives, exploring the implications misaligned definitions- learning & instruction, identifying strategies to minimize the gap and promote learning

Read more about the webinar from this link: https://www.magnapubs.com/online-seminars/aligning-student-and-faculty-perceptions-of-rigor-14540-1.html

Thursday September 28, 12:00-1:00 in the Lakeview Conference Room (LU 206)
(Almost) Everything You Need to Know about Undergraduate Research at Concordia University
Julie Dresen and Daniel McCollum (Office of Sponsored Programs)

Participants will learn: What undergraduate research is and what it is not; undergraduate research best practices; current faculty mentor/student projects; and benefits of undergraduate research for faculty and for their students. Participants will also receive a brief introduction to the Council for Undergraduate Research website and Concordia’s Undergraduate Research website.

Thursday, October 5, 12:15-1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Concordia Faculty Seminar: Utilizing Alternative Planes of Motion for Hamstring Stretching: Can it Reduce Pain, Improve Range of Motion, Increase Muscle Strength, and Facilitate Early Return to Performance in Recreational Athletes with Acute Exercise-Induced Muscular Damage?
With Dr. Darrin Smith and introduced by Dr. Leah Dvorak

Stretching treatments associated with muscle injury that re-creates pain or mechanism of injury is contraindicated. To date, no studies have explored the efficacy of treating a damaged muscle group utilizing flexibility protocols that are based on selectively single or combined planes of motion. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine if daily stretching, utilizing alternative planes of motion for exercised-induced hamstring muscle damage (EIMD), would result in pain reduction, improved range of motion, increased muscle strength, and facilitation of early return to performance over 96 hours.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Monday, October 9, 10:00-11:00am (webinar only)
Getting Started with Blackboard Collaborate
Susan Gallanis and Susie Stanley

Learn how to navigate and set up Blackboard Collaborate, a web conferencing tool you can use to meet virtually and synchronously with your students, such as for online office hours. You’ll also see how to set up sessions for groups of students to meet without the instructor being present.

Wednesday, October 11, 8:30-9:30 am in R006
Blackboard Basics (F2F and Webinar)
Susan Gallanis

Log in and basic navigation, add course content, set up grade center, grade assignments, open course to students.

Thursday October 12, 11:00-12:00 in R006
Choosing the Right Sample Size for my Study
Angela Walmsley

The most common question I get at Concordia is “how big does my sample need to be?”  Unfortunately this isn’t as easy of an answer as we would like; and various factors contribute to the appropriate sample size.Participants will learn about the various components that go into choosing the correct sample size for a study (including a short description on terms such as margin of error, confidence level, power and Type I and II errors).  In addition, I will show a few websites that can be used and the common program, GPower, that many researchers use to aid in sample size guidance.

Thursday, October 12, 7:30-8:30 am in the Lakeshore Room
Servant Leader Roundtable

The October meeting’s topic is: More than Good Intentions: the Intention- Doing Gap
“The older I get, the less attention I pay to what people say and the more attention I pay to what people do. People talk a lot alike-but it’s often only lip service. It’s only in their actions that the differences show up. Intentions –Actions = Squat. Intentions + Actions = Will.” ~ James Hunter

Monday, October 16, 12:15 – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Concordia Faculty Seminar: Design, Implementation, and Analysis of an Interactive Educational Hypertension Curriculum with Dr. Diane Ames, DNP, FNP-BC and introduced by Dan McCollum, Office of Sponsored Programs

This presentation will discuss how a team of multidisciplinary learners and faculty created four hypertension conversation maps with facilitator guides for an underserved population.  Additional discussion topics will include securing external funding and developing a partnership between academia and a health care system. Tips and lessons learned from this interdisciplinary project will be explored.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Tuesday, October 17, 10:00-11:00 am in R006
Blackboard Collaborate (F2F only)
Justin Frisque

Learn how to navigate and set up Blackboard Collaborate, a web conferencing tool you can use to meet virtually and synchronously with your students

Friday, November 3, 1:00-2:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Assessments & Rubrics (F2F and Webinar)
Susan Gallanis

Create an assessment with 5 question types, create a question pool, create a rubric and grade using a rubric.

Monday, November 6, 2:00-3:00 pm in R006
Blackboard More Tools (F2F and Webinar)
Justin Frisque

Embed YouTube video, discussion forums, email/course messages, add the Panopto tool.

Wednesday, November 8, 12:00-1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Faculty Advising Part 2: The Deep Conversations
Led by Andy Miller, Director of Academic Advising & Retention

The Advising relationship can be among the most robust employee-student relationships on campus. As an advisor you have a special opportunity to connect with students beyond the classroom, oftentimes in deep and meaningful ways. Sometimes even the most extroverted students can be a bit reticent. Join the Advising Staff for Part 2 of our Fall Advising Lunch n’ Learn* sessions and learn some practical ways to ask the right questions, to get students to open up, and to use conversation to bolster student autonomy, motivation, and self-efficacy.

*All faculty are welcome to attend, but lunch is provided for faculty advisors only.

Thursday, November 9, 7:30-8:30 am in the Lakeshore Room
Servant Leader Roundtable

The November meeting’s topic is: Putting Others First
“When a leader keeps personal ego in check – and builds the confidence and self-esteem of others – it is possible for the team to work together.” ~ Ken Jennings and John Stahl-Wert

Thursday, November 9, 12:15 – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Concordia Faculty Seminar: How to Detect a $79 Million Lunar Explosion from Earth with Dr. Paul Strycker and introduced by Dan McCollum, Office of Sponsored Programs

In 2009, NASA conducted the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission, in which a rocket booster traveling at 5,600 mph was steered into the Moon. Despite expectations that the impact’s plume of lunar dust would be easily visible from Earth, no one watching from Earth—including thirteen major research telescopes—detected anything in their images. This talk will describe how data with a missing impact plume led to a new video-analysis technique, the discovery of the plume, and a continuing research project to determine the properties of this man-made lunar explosion.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Thursday November 9, 2:00-3:00pm (webinar only)
Getting Started with Blackboard Collaborate
Susan Gallanis and Susie Stanley

Learn how to navigate and set up Blackboard Collaborate, a web conferencing tool you can use to meet virtually and synchronously with your students, such as for online office hours. You’ll also see how to set up sessions for groups of students to meet without the instructor being present.

Thursday, December 14, 7:30-8:30am in the Lakeshore Room
Servant Leader Roundtable

The December meeting’s topic is: The Gift of Feedback
“Feedback is a gift. If somebody gives you a gift, what do you say to them? ‘Thank you.’ Then you say.. Are there any special instructions to help me use it? Who else do I need to ask about it?” ~Ken Blanchard and Phil Hodges

CUW Summer 2017 Programs

CELT Summer Book Group

“Grit: the Power of Passion and Perseverance” written by Angela Duckworth
Tuesdays Noon to 1pm in R006
May 30, June 6, June 13, June 20, June 27
Free book if you register by May 23

Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn’t the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. In this 6-minute TED Talk about her book, she explains her theory of “grit” as a predictor of success: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H14bBuluwB8

New and Returning Faculty Development Day

Monday August 7, 8:30-4:00pm
Sign up for all sessions you are able to attend
Lunch included if you sign up for a morning and an afternoon session

Schedule of Events

8:30 – 9:45am Crafting Your Syllabus led by Sarah Lovern

  • Includes: using the Concordia syllabus template including the credit hour policy and Blackboard Learn information for students.

10:00am – Noon Blackboard Basics (hands on) led by Susan Gallanis and Justin Frisque

  • Learn the fundamentals and set up gradebook for a fall course! Includes: adding content (folder, file, web link); creating an assignment (was called a drop box in ANGEL); setting up the Grade Center; adding a test student; adding a user; and opening a course to students. Bring your laptop.

1:00 – 2:00pm Active Lecturing led by Susan Gallanis

  • Learn strategies to maintain students’ attention when you lecture including effective PowerPoint design

2:15 – 3:00pm Blackboard Assessments led by Justin Frisque

  • Includes: creating tests with several question types, creating and using question pools.

3:00 – 4:00pm Blackboard Collaborate led by Justin Frisque and Susan Gallanis

  • Includes: Introduction to using Blackboard Collaborate and how it can be used for scheduling online office hours and guest presentations.