Fall 2017 CELT Programs at CUAA

CUAA Fall Faculty Book Group
Three meetings, all in SCI 102: Wednesday September 27, 3:30-4:30; Thursday October 26, 4:00-5:00; Wednesday November 15, 3:30-4:40

Join colleagues for discussion of the book The College Fear Factor: How Students and Professors Misunderstand One Another by Rebecca D. Cox. Book group facilitated by Robert Hill.

About the book: Rebecca D. Cox draws on five years of interviews and observations at community colleges. She shows how students and their instructors misunderstand and ultimately fail one another, despite good intentions. Most memorably, she describes how easily students can feel defeated―by their real-world responsibilities and by the demands of college―and come to conclude that they just don’t belong there after all.

“The College Fear Factor” reveals how the traditional college culture can actually pose obstacles to students’ success, and suggests strategies for effectively explaining academic expectations.

Thursday September 14, 3:45-4:45 in SCI 102
Managing Difficult Conversations in the Classroom
Led by Jeff Schwehm and Glenda Waterman

This is a continuation of the successful session that took place during the May 2017 Faculty Institute.

Tuesday October 3, 4:00-5:00 in SCI 102
Wiki-Working: A Partial, Palatable Flip for the Conventional, Lecture-Based Classroom
Led by Dr. Matt Schumann

Wednesday November 29, 3:30-4:30 in SCI 102
Fall 2017: The Thrill of Victory and the Agony of Defeat

This is a roundtable faculty discussion of what worked—and didn’t—in the classroom. Facilitated by Robert Hill.

Fall 2017 Programs at CUW

CELT Fall Faculty Book Group
Mondays, 2:00 to 3:00pm in R006
4 meetings: September 25, October 16, October 30, November 13
Led by: Sarah Lovern

Join colleagues for discussion of the book “The College Fear Factor: How Students and Professors Misunderstand One Another” by Rebecca D. Cox.

About the book: Rebecca D. Cox draws on five years of interviews and observations at community colleges. She shows how students and their instructors misunderstand and ultimately fail one another, despite good intentions. Most memorably, she describes how easily students can feel defeated―by their real-world responsibilities and by the demands of college―and come to conclude that they just don’t belong there after all.

“The College Fear Factor” reveals how the traditional college culture can actually pose obstacles to students’ success, and suggests strategies for effectively explaining academic expectations.

Faith, Learning and Vocation Book Group
Restoring the Soul of the University: Unifying Christian Higher Education in a Fragmented Age
Wednesdays 12:00-1:00 in R006
3 meetings: September 20, October 18, November 15

Faculty and staff are invited to join Bernard Bull as he leads this book discussion.

About the book: Has the American university gained the whole world but lost its soul? In terms of money, prestige, power, and freedom, American universities appear to have gained the academic world. But at what cost? We live in the age of the fragmented multiversity that has no unifying soul or mission. The multiversity in a post-Christian culture is characterized instead by curricular division, the professionalization of the disciplines, the expansion of administration, the loss of community, and the idolization of athletics. The situation is not hopeless. According to the authors of this book, Perry L. Glanzer, Nathan F. Alleman, and Todd C. Ream, Christian universities can recover their soul―but to do so will require reimagining excellence in a time of exile, placing the liberating arts before the liberal arts, and focusing on the worship, love, and knowledge of God as central to the university. Restoring the Soul of the University is a pioneering work that charts the history of the university and casts an inspiring vision for the future of higher education.

Thursday, August 10, 7:30-8:30 am in the Lakeshore Room
Servant Leader Roundtable

The August meeting’s topic is: Character
“Thoughts become actions, actions become habits, habits become our character, and our character becomes our destiny.” ~ James Hunter

Monday, August 21, 12:00- 1:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Basics (F2F and Webinar)
Susan Gallanis

Log in and basic navigation, add course content, set up grade center, grade assignments, open course to students.

Tuesday, August 22, 12:00- 1:00 pm in R006
Blackboard More Tools (F2F and Webinar)
Justin Frisque

Embed YouTube video, discussion forums, email/course messages, add the Panopto tool.

Wednesday, August 23, 12:00-1:00 pm in LU006 (Media Viewing Room)
Teaching via Video Conference
Susan Gallanis and Justin Frisque

Learn how to use Concordia University’s video conference equipment to connect and teach your course to other Concordia locations as well as best practices for teaching via video conference.

Thursday, August 24, 12:00 – 1:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Assessments & Rubrics (F2F and Webinar)
Justin Frisque

Create an assessment with 5 question types, create a question pool, create a rubric and grade using a rubric.

Friday, August 25, 12:00 -1:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Collaborate (F2f only)
Susan Gallanis

Learn how to navigate and set up Blackboard Collaborate, a web conferencing tool you can use to meet virtually and synchronously with your students, such as for online office hours. You’ll also see how to set up sessions for groups of students to meet without the instructor being present.

Thursday, August 31, 1:00-2:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Motivate, Engage, and Inspire: Tips for Teaching Modern Learners, a Magna Live Webinar
Christy Price, EdD

This webinar provides you with a comprehensive look at the modern learner. Find out what makes Millennials tick, what’s different in how they learn (and why it’s different), and the research data that will help you understand what it all means.

Dr. Price will help you identify the teaching methods that work best for modern learners, including several strategies to better engage and motivate your Millennial students. She’ll focus on what she calls the five new R’s: Research, rationale, relaxed, rapport, and research-based methods. She’ll delve in-depth into each “R” and why each one is critical to helping your modern students succeed.

Read more about the webinar from this link: https://www.magnapubs.com/online-seminars/motivate-engage-and-inspire-tips-for-teaching-modern-learners-14537-1.html 

Wednesday, September 6, 1:00-2:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Basics (F2F and Webinar)
Susan Gallanis

Log in and basic navigation, add course content, set up grade center, grade assignments, open course to students.

Monday, September 11, 1:00-2:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Assessments & Rubrics (F2F and Webinar)
Justin Frisque

Create an assessment with 5 question types, create a question pool, create a rubric and grade using a rubric.

Wednesday September 13, 10:00-11:00 in the Lake Shore Room
Ancillary Research Agreements presented by Attorney Tom Hall

This program is for faculty and staff and brought to you by the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP). This workshop will examine the different types of ancillary research agreements (confidentiality disclosure agreements, research agreements, material transfer agreements, etc.), when and why they are necessary, problematic clauses, and negotiation tips and tricks.

Learning Objectives: Participants will learn when an ancillary agreement may be necessary; become familiar with the differ types of ancillary agreements; learn problematic terms in ancillary research agreements; learn negotiation tips for ancillary agreements

Thursday, September 14, 7:30-8:30 am in the Lakeshore Room
Servant Leader Roundtable

The September meeting’s topic is: Influence vs. Coercion
“If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up the men to gather wood, divide the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea.” ~ Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Thursday, September 14, 12:00-1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Faculty Advising Part 1: The Nuts and Bolts of AdvisingLed by Andy Miller, Director of Academic Advising & Retention

Are you a faculty advisor for Trad UG students? Do we all know what that entails? Join the Academic Advising Office for a Lunch and Learn* where we’ll discuss the role of a faculty advisor and share some helpful tricks of the trade.

*All faculty are welcome to attend, but lunch is provided for faculty advisors only.

Monday, September 18, 12:00-1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room (Lunch n’ Learn)
Who is Luther? Led by Jason Lane

Martin Luther, the most significant figure of the Protestant Reformation, and arguably the most influential figure in Western Church since St. Augustine, remains for so many an enigmatic figure. For some, he is too Catholic. For others, too Protestant. He is too political or not political enough, too conservative or too liberal, too jovial or too depressed. So who is Luther? This Lunch n’ Learn is designed particularly for faculty who want better to understand the life and thought of Martin Luther and, further, to understand from studying Luther why it matters that we are a Lutheran University.Free lunch for Faculty who register in advance. (Up to 20)

Tuesday, September 19, 5:30-6:30pm (webinar only)
Getting Started with Blackboard Collaborate
Susan Gallanis and Susie Stanley

Learn how to navigate and set up Blackboard Collaborate, a web conferencing tool you can use to meet virtually and synchronously with your students, such as for online office hours. You’ll also see how to set up sessions for groups of students to meet without the instructor being present.

Thursday, September 21, 3:00 – 4:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Group Tools (F2F and Webinar)
Susan Gallanis

Learn how to set up groups, use group tools, and create and grade group assignments.

Wednesday, September 27, 1:00- 2:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Aligning Student and Faculty Perceptions of Rigor, a Magna Live Webinar
Lolita Paff, PhD

There is value in exploring student and faculty perceptions about rigor and learning. Teachers can’t dispel student misperceptions if they don’t know about them. The strategies in this seminar help teachers expand students’ concept and definition of learning, get students thinking about how they learn, and promote self-directed learning.
Topics Covered: Defining rigor- student and faculty perspectives, exploring the implications misaligned definitions- learning & instruction, identifying strategies to minimize the gap and promote learning

Read more about the webinar from this link: https://www.magnapubs.com/online-seminars/aligning-student-and-faculty-perceptions-of-rigor-14540-1.html

Thursday September 28, 12:00-1:00 in the Lakeview Conference Room (LU 206)
(Almost) Everything You Need to Know about Undergraduate Research at Concordia University
Julie Dresen and Daniel McCollum (Office of Sponsored Programs)

Participants will learn: What undergraduate research is and what it is not; undergraduate research best practices; current faculty mentor/student projects; and benefits of undergraduate research for faculty and for their students. Participants will also receive a brief introduction to the Council for Undergraduate Research website and Concordia’s Undergraduate Research website.

Thursday, October 5, 12:15-1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Concordia Faculty Seminar: Utilizing Alternative Planes of Motion for Hamstring Stretching: Can it Reduce Pain, Improve Range of Motion, Increase Muscle Strength, and Facilitate Early Return to Performance in Recreational Athletes with Acute Exercise-Induced Muscular Damage?
With Dr. Darrin Smith and introduced by Dr. Leah Dvorak

Stretching treatments associated with muscle injury that re-creates pain or mechanism of injury is contraindicated. To date, no studies have explored the efficacy of treating a damaged muscle group utilizing flexibility protocols that are based on selectively single or combined planes of motion. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine if daily stretching, utilizing alternative planes of motion for exercised-induced hamstring muscle damage (EIMD), would result in pain reduction, improved range of motion, increased muscle strength, and facilitation of early return to performance over 96 hours.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Monday, October 9, 10:00-11:00am (webinar only)
Getting Started with Blackboard Collaborate
Susan Gallanis and Susie Stanley

Learn how to navigate and set up Blackboard Collaborate, a web conferencing tool you can use to meet virtually and synchronously with your students, such as for online office hours. You’ll also see how to set up sessions for groups of students to meet without the instructor being present.

Wednesday, October 11, 8:30-9:30 am in R006
Blackboard Basics (F2F and Webinar)
Susan Gallanis

Log in and basic navigation, add course content, set up grade center, grade assignments, open course to students.

Thursday October 12, 11:00-12:00 in R006
Choosing the Right Sample Size for my Study
Angela Walmsley

The most common question I get at Concordia is “how big does my sample need to be?”  Unfortunately this isn’t as easy of an answer as we would like; and various factors contribute to the appropriate sample size.Participants will learn about the various components that go into choosing the correct sample size for a study (including a short description on terms such as margin of error, confidence level, power and Type I and II errors).  In addition, I will show a few websites that can be used and the common program, GPower, that many researchers use to aid in sample size guidance.

Thursday, October 12, 7:30-8:30 am in the Lakeshore Room
Servant Leader Roundtable

The October meeting’s topic is: More than Good Intentions: the Intention- Doing Gap
“The older I get, the less attention I pay to what people say and the more attention I pay to what people do. People talk a lot alike-but it’s often only lip service. It’s only in their actions that the differences show up. Intentions –Actions = Squat. Intentions + Actions = Will.” ~ James Hunter

Monday, October 16, 12:15 – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Concordia Faculty Seminar: Design, Implementation, and Analysis of an Interactive Educational Hypertension Curriculum with Dr. Diane Ames, DNP, FNP-BC and introduced by Dan McCollum, Office of Sponsored Programs

This presentation will discuss how a team of multidisciplinary learners and faculty created four hypertension conversation maps with facilitator guides for an underserved population.  Additional discussion topics will include securing external funding and developing a partnership between academia and a health care system. Tips and lessons learned from this interdisciplinary project will be explored.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Tuesday, October 17, 10:00-11:00 am in R006
Blackboard Collaborate (F2F only)
Justin Frisque

Learn how to navigate and set up Blackboard Collaborate, a web conferencing tool you can use to meet virtually and synchronously with your students

Friday, November 3, 1:00-2:00 pm in R006
Blackboard Assessments & Rubrics (F2F and Webinar)
Susan Gallanis

Create an assessment with 5 question types, create a question pool, create a rubric and grade using a rubric.

Monday, November 6, 2:00-3:00 pm in R006
Blackboard More Tools (F2F and Webinar)
Justin Frisque

Embed YouTube video, discussion forums, email/course messages, add the Panopto tool.

Wednesday, November 8, 12:00-1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Faculty Advising Part 2: The Deep Conversations
Led by Andy Miller, Director of Academic Advising & Retention

The Advising relationship can be among the most robust employee-student relationships on campus. As an advisor you have a special opportunity to connect with students beyond the classroom, oftentimes in deep and meaningful ways. Sometimes even the most extroverted students can be a bit reticent. Join the Advising Staff for Part 2 of our Fall Advising Lunch n’ Learn* sessions and learn some practical ways to ask the right questions, to get students to open up, and to use conversation to bolster student autonomy, motivation, and self-efficacy.

*All faculty are welcome to attend, but lunch is provided for faculty advisors only.

Thursday, November 9, 7:30-8:30 am in the Lakeshore Room
Servant Leader Roundtable

The November meeting’s topic is: Putting Others First
“When a leader keeps personal ego in check – and builds the confidence and self-esteem of others – it is possible for the team to work together.” ~ Ken Jennings and John Stahl-Wert

Thursday, November 9, 12:15 – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Concordia Faculty Seminar: How to Detect a $79 Million Lunar Explosion from Earth with Dr. Paul Strycker and introduced by Dan McCollum, Office of Sponsored Programs

In 2009, NASA conducted the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission, in which a rocket booster traveling at 5,600 mph was steered into the Moon. Despite expectations that the impact’s plume of lunar dust would be easily visible from Earth, no one watching from Earth—including thirteen major research telescopes—detected anything in their images. This talk will describe how data with a missing impact plume led to a new video-analysis technique, the discovery of the plume, and a continuing research project to determine the properties of this man-made lunar explosion.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Thursday November 9, 2:00-3:00pm (webinar only)
Getting Started with Blackboard Collaborate
Susan Gallanis and Susie Stanley

Learn how to navigate and set up Blackboard Collaborate, a web conferencing tool you can use to meet virtually and synchronously with your students, such as for online office hours. You’ll also see how to set up sessions for groups of students to meet without the instructor being present.

Thursday, December 14, 7:30-8:30am in the Lakeshore Room
Servant Leader Roundtable

The December meeting’s topic is: The Gift of Feedback
“Feedback is a gift. If somebody gives you a gift, what do you say to them? ‘Thank you.’ Then you say.. Are there any special instructions to help me use it? Who else do I need to ask about it?” ~Ken Blanchard and Phil Hodges

CUW Summer 2017 Programs

CELT Summer Book Group

“Grit: the Power of Passion and Perseverance” written by Angela Duckworth
Tuesdays Noon to 1pm in R006
May 30, June 6, June 13, June 20, June 27
Free book if you register by May 23

Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn’t the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. In this 6-minute TED Talk about her book, she explains her theory of “grit” as a predictor of success: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H14bBuluwB8

New and Returning Faculty Development Day

Monday August 7, 8:30-4:00pm
Sign up for all sessions you are able to attend
Lunch included if you sign up for a morning and an afternoon session

Schedule of Events

8:30 – 9:45am Crafting Your Syllabus led by Sarah Lovern

  • Includes: using the Concordia syllabus template including the credit hour policy and Blackboard Learn information for students.

10:00am – Noon Blackboard Basics (hands on) led by Susan Gallanis and Justin Frisque

  • Learn the fundamentals and set up gradebook for a fall course! Includes: adding content (folder, file, web link); creating an assignment (was called a drop box in ANGEL); setting up the Grade Center; adding a test student; adding a user; and opening a course to students. Bring your laptop.

1:00 – 2:00pm Active Lecturing led by Susan Gallanis

  • Learn strategies to maintain students’ attention when you lecture including effective PowerPoint design

2:15 – 3:00pm Blackboard Assessments led by Justin Frisque

  • Includes: creating tests with several question types, creating and using question pools.

3:00 – 4:00pm Blackboard Collaborate led by Justin Frisque and Susan Gallanis

  • Includes: Introduction to using Blackboard Collaborate and how it can be used for scheduling online office hours and guest presentations.

 

Worldview of Worldviews: What the Christian Worldview Means for our Teaching and Learning at Concordia

Join us for this Faith, Learning and Vocation event on Wednesday September 28, 12:00-1:00 in the Lake Shore Room
Led by Jason Lane (Theology) and Susan Mobley (History)

Miss the session? Here is a link to the recorded session: link to recording

The University Liberal Arts Outcomes (ULAOs) include a learning outcome on worldview proficiency. This session introduces faculty to an understanding of how a Christian worldview informs teaching and learning and includes practical examples of how to integrate a Christian worldview in classroom discussions in multiple disciplines.

Handouts:
Core Curriculum Vision Statement

Jason Lane’s Handout

Susan Mobley’s Handout

Worldview Powerpoint

Pitfalls of Writing Learning Objectives and Writing Multiple Choice Test Questions

Resources related to the above September 2016 Lunch and Learn presented by Beth DeJongh (Pharmacy) and Susan Gallanis (CELT).

PowerPoint Slides: link to resource

A collection of Bloom’s Taxonomy verbs: link to resource

Another example of Bloom’s Taxonomy: link to resource

Writing Learning Objectives Using Bloom’s Taxonomy from UNC Charlotte: link to resource

Another resource for writing learning objectives: link to resource

15-minute YouTube video from Greg Williams about writing learning objectives: link to video

How to Write Better Tests from Lucy Jacobs at Indiana University: link to resource

A resource for writing multiple choice test questions from the Concordia University library (you will need to log into the CU library to view): CUW link      CUAA link

2016 – 2017 Past CELT Programs at the Ann Arbor Campus

Summer, 2016

CUAA Faculty Development Day

Thursday August 18, 1:30-3:30 (Krieger 101)
Led by Susan Gallanis and Elizabeth Evans

Blackboard Basics (with hands-on practice, bring your laptop)

Monday August 22, 1:00-2:30pm (Science 102)
Led by Justin Frisque and Susan Gallanis

Fall, 2016

Discussion as a Way of Teaching

Thursday September 15, 4:00-5:00 in Krieger 107
Led by Glenda Waterman

Student Engagement Techniques

Thursday October 13, 4:00-5:00 in Krieger 107
Led by Glenda Waterman

The Power of Helping Students See Their Learning Progress

Wednesday November 9, 1:00-2:00 in the Music Lecture Hall
Led by Bernard Bull (live streamed from Mequon)

Fall Book Group

Specifications Grading: Restoring Rigor, Motivating Students and Saving Faculty Time
Book written by Linda Nilson
Group led by Jeff Schwehm
Meet 3 Tuesdays, 4:00-5:00 in Science 101: October 4, October 25, November 15.

Spring 2017

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Scholarship and Service – Conceiving the Entrepreneurial College: An Evaluation of Alternative Operating Models in 21st Century Higher Education

Friday February 17, 1:00-2:00 in Kreft Music Lecture Hall
Led By: Suzanne Siegle

This program for faculty, staff and students presents an evaluation of different and more entrepreneurial models in higher education today in areas like teaching/learning design, financing, operations etc., to see what might be possible/transferable for colleges and universities today looking to innovate, change, survive and grow.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Scholarship and Service – Assessing Technical Inefficiency in Private not-for-profit Bachelor’s and Master’s Universities in the United States using Stochastic Frontier Estimation

Wednesday February 22, 4:00-5:00 in Science 101
Led by James Refenes

This program for faculty, staff and students focuses on the technical inefficiency of 813 private not-for-profit, 4-year, Bachelor’s and Master’s colleges and universities in the U.S. using data from 2006-2011 were explored. The goal of the study was to describe and explain the level of technical inefficiency in this group of institutions that can be identified using a Stochastic Frontier Estimation (SFE) method and to evaluate the applicability of SFE to higher education.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Faculty Book Group
Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do. Written by Claude M. Steele

Led by: by Director of Student Life Dauthan Keener, Dean of Students Rev. John Rathje, and Campus Dean College of Education Dr. Sandra Harris

Tuesday – March 7, 4:00-5:00 in Krieger 107; Wednesday – March 29, & Thursday – April 27, 4:00-5:00 in Sci 101
Register by Wednesday February 22 to receive the book for free.

This program is for faculty. About the book: Claude M. Steele, who has been called “one of the few great social psychologists,” offers a vivid first-person account of the research that supports his groundbreaking conclusions on stereotypes and identity. He sheds new light on American social phenomena from racial and gender gaps in test scores to the belief in the superior athletic prowess of black men, and lays out a plan for mitigating these “stereotype threats” and reshaping American identities.

How to Build Student Engagement in CoursEval

Thursday March 30, 4:00-5:00 in Science 102
Led by Jeff Schwehm

This program is for faculty. Students often do not understand the importance of providing effective constructive feedback to their instructors in the end of course rating form. This session will offer a set of strategies to improve not only the quality of student comments but the participation rate of your students in the instructor rating form.

2017 Ann Arbor Faculty Institute Thursday May 18, 20172017 Ann Arbor Faculty Institute Thursday May 18, 2017

8:30-10:00: Blackboard Grade Center with Jan Weisenbach
Based on a recent CUAA Faculty survey, the first part of this session will answer Blackboard-related questions. In the second part of this session we will show you how to set up a grade center in Blackboard, with focus on specific issues CUAA Faculty have experienced.

10:15-12:00: Managing Difficult Conversations in the Classroom with Jeffery Schwehm and Glenda Waterman
A discussion on different approaches to facilitating discussions on controversial topics in the classroom with suggestions on how one may handle those expected and unexpected “hot moment(s)” that may occur during these types of classroom discussions.

12:00-1:30: Assessment Report Working Lunch with Elizabeth Peckham and members of the Assessment Committee
Do you have questions on your assessment report? Would you like to get feedback? Come have lunch with the assessment committee! The assessment committee will be available during lunch to provide guidance and assist with any questions you might have about the report.

1:30-3:00: Teaching through Simulation with Anita Simmons, MSN, RN
Learn how simulation is being used as a teaching strategy in nursing, Justice and Public Policy, and other programs at CUAA and how it could be integrated into your course. During this session, you will have the opportunity to watch footage of previously recorded simulations, participate in a simulation in a variety of roles (actor, student, observer), and hear about the effectiveness of simulation from faculty who have used it.

3:15-4:45: Blackboard Learn Collaborate with Susan Gallanis and Justin Frisque
Learn how to use Blackboard Learn Collaborate, a web conferencing tool you can use to meeting virtually and synchronously with your students. You will also learn how can allow groups of students to meet virtually and synchronously without the instructor needing to be present (for example, group projects).

2016 – 2017 Past CELT Programs at the Mequon Campus

Here’s what the CELT has been up to since May, 2016:

Summer 2016

Summer Book Group – Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die

by Chip Heath and Dan Heath
Book group facilitated by Dean Arneson

Four Thursdays: June 16, June 30, July 14, July 28
All from 11:30-12:30 in R006

About the book: Why do some ideas thrive while others die? And how do we improve the chances of worthy ideas? In Made to Stick, accomplished educators and idea collectors Chip and Dan Heath tackle head-on these vexing questions. Inside, the Heath brothers reveal the anatomy of ideas that “stick” and explain sure-fire meth¬ods for making ideas stickier, such as violating schemas, using the Velcro Theory of Memory, and creating “curiosity gaps.”

New and Returning Faculty Development Day including face-to-face Blackboard Training

Chose from two dates:
Wednesday August 10 
Tuesday August 23

Schedule:

8:30-9:45 Crafting Your Syllabus – led by Elizabeth Evans
Includes using the Concordia syllabus template including the credit hour policy and Blackboard Learn information for students.

10:00-Noon Blackboard Basics – hands on practice included
Log in and basic navigation, add course content, set up grade center, grade assignments, open course to students.

Noon – 1:00 Lunch

1:15-2:15 Active Lecturing – led by Susan Gallanis
Learn strategies to maintain students’ attention when you lecture including effective PowerPoint design.

2:30-3:30 Blackboard More Tools
Embed a YouTube video, discussion forums, email/course messages, Panopto.

3:30-4:30 Blackboard Assessments and Rubrics
Create an assessment with 5 question types, create a question pool, create a rubric and grade using a rubric.

Using Panopto

Wednesday August 24, 10:00-11:00am in LU006
Led by Justin Frisque

Teaching via Video Conference

Wednesday August 24, 1:00-2:00pm in LU006
Led by Justin Frisque and Susan Gallanis

Supporting Students with Disabilities: Using Technology to Increase Access

Thursday August 25, 2:00-3:00 in Phar 039
Led by Ashley Mueller (LRC) and Susan Gallanis (CELT)

Fall 2016

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Discovery of New Treatments for Severe Pain Lacking Dependence

Monday September 12, 11:45-12:30 in the Lake Shore Room
Led by Chris Cunningham (Pharmacy)

First in a series of informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. Bring your own lunch; dessert provided by the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP)

Magna Live Webinar: How to Design and Facilitate Online Discussions that Improve Student Learning and Engagement

Tuesday September 13, 1:00-2:00 in the Lake Shore Room

In this session, we will review how online discussion design and facilitation have evolved and provide practical strategies and tools you can use to create a cohesive online learning community that will enhance student engagement and learning.

Lunch and Learn: Pitfalls of Writing Learning Objectives and Writing Multiple Choice Test Questions

Thursday September 15, 12:00-1:00 in the Lake Shore Room
Led by Beth DeJongh (Pharmacy) and Susan Gallanis (CELT)

Brown Bag: Peer Review of Teaching

Wednesday September 21, 12:00-1:00 in R006
Led by Elizabeth Evans

Learn how to support one another through teaching observations.

How to Lead a Focus Group for Data Collection

Thursday September 22, 12:00-1:00 in R006
Led by Angela Walmsley

Participants will learn about the value of focus groups in data collection, particularly in qualitative or mixed methods studies. Topics: set up a focus group, best techniques for a successful turnout, data collection, and interview protocol.

Blackboard Portfolios

Monday September 26, 2:00-3:00 in R006
Led by Susan Gallanis

Faith, Learning and Vocation: Worldview of Worldviews: What the Christian Worldview Means for our Teaching and Learning at Concordia

Wednesday September 28, 12:00-1:00 in the Lake Shore Room
Led by Jason Lane (Theology) and Susan Mobley (History)

The University Liberal Arts Outcomes (ULAOs) include a learning outcome on worldview proficiency. This session introduces faculty to an understanding of how a Christian worldview informs teaching and learning and includes practical examples of how to integrate a Christian worldview in classroom discussions in multiple disciplines.

GrantForward – Identifying Potential Funders for Your Program

Tuesday October 4, 3:00-4:00 in R006
Presented by the Office of Sponsored Programs: Daniel R. McCollum and Julie Dresen

Learn how to locate potential funders for your research project; select a funder; identify funder rules and regulations. Participants will also be introduced to the steps of the application and earn how to obtain the necessary internal approvals.

Learn to use Cayuse424 to Create and Submit Grants

Thursday October 6, 12:00-1:00 in R006
Presented by the Office of Sponsored Programs: Daniel R. McCollum and Julie Dresen

Demonstration of Cayuse424, a fast, easy-to-use web application created specifically to simplify the creation, review, approval, and electronic submission of grant proposals.

Ancillary Research Agreements
Presented by the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP)

Friday October 7, 12:00-1:00 in R006
Led by Tom Hall (Attorney at Law) and Daniel Sem (Dean, School of Business)

This workshop will examine the different types of ancillary research agreements, when and why they are necessary, problematic clauses, and negotiation tips and tricks. Participants will: learn when an ancillary agreement may be necessary, become familiar with the different types of ancillary agreements, learn problematic terms in ancillary research agreements, and learn negotiation tips for ancillary agreements.

Lunch and Learn: How to Build Student Engagement in Course Eval

Wednesday October 12, 12:00-1:00 in the Lake Shore Room
Led by Carrie Scheel

Students often do not understand the importance of providing effective constructive feedback to their instructors in the end of course rating form. This session will offer a set of strategies to improve not only the quality of student comments but the participation rate of your students in the instructor rating form.

Faith, Learning and Vocation: Christ at the Center of Curricula

Wednesday October 26, 12:00-1:00 in the Terrace Room
Led by John Montgomery

Teaching some “secular” subjects from a Christian standpoint may appear difficult or impossible.  Faculty teaching in disciplines that do not immediately seem to lend themselves to a faith and learning connection may believe that the only possible witness to students is a “good Christian life” or prayer at the beginning of class. This session offers examples of theological and apologetical integration in a variety of academic fields, with the aim of encouraging faculty to connect Christian faith and learning here at Concordia, committed as we are to a biblical worldview.  Time permitting, illustrations from diverse fields such as mathematics, chemistry, medical areas, history, literature, law & human rights may be included.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Detecting Computer Intrusions

Thursday October 27, 11:45-12:30 in the Lake Shore Room
Led by Robert Wahl (Computer Science)

Cyber attacks and computer intrusions impact businesses and individuals, leading to the loss of confidential information and potentially large financial impacts.  In this presentation of recent dissertation research, detection and prevention techniques will be described.  A goal of this quantitative research was to determine if slower responses to attacks increased the severity of damage to companies.

Introduction to Quantitative and Qualitative Methods (Mixed Method Studies)

Thursday November 3, 12:00-1:00 in R006
Led by Angela Walmsley

This introductory research session is designed for faculty who would like to utilize a mixed methods approach to collect data or evaluate a program. Participants will learn introductory techniques to develop a study that involves both quantitative and qualitative methods.

Lunch and Learn: The Power of Helping Students See Their Learning Progress

Wednesday November 9, 12:00-1:00 in the Terrace Room
Led by Bernard Bull

Making student progress visible is a powerful tool for increasing confidence, motivation, and learning. In this session, we will explore of a series of strategies for doing this in your course.

Faith, Learning, and Vocation: A Gospel Understanding of Human Nature

Thursday November 17, 12:00-1:00 in the Lake Shore Room
Led by Jason Lane and Rachel Pickett

The University Liberal Arts Outcomes (ULAOs) include reference to students learning a “biblical understanding of human nature in relationship to the Gospel.” This presentation/conversation expands on the meaning of this area of the core and how it might impact teaching in other disciplines.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Embedded Librarian: Tool Development and Feasibility Study

Monday November 21, 11:45-12:30 in the Lake Shore Room
Led by Janet Levey

Embedded librarians provide library services directly to online students and are present throughout a course at the postsecondary level. In this role, embedded librarians are vital in guiding students to scholarly materials and developing the learners’ research skills. Online courses have incorporated embedded librarians since 2005; however, this pedagogy is underutilized in online nursing education. A preliminary study using the Levey-Nowak Embedded Librarian Presence Instrument was undertaken to discover the underlying structure of the phenomena of an embedded librarian.

Assessment Showcase

Led By: Jane Bishop and Elizabeth Evans
Sponsored by the Assessment Committee
Monday November 28, 1:00-2:00 in the Lake Shore Room.

This session focuses on traditional undergraduate business. The goal is to increase faculty knowledge of effective assessment practice at the program level. The Assessment Committee offers the Assess¬ment Showcase and “indicators of good practice” in assessment of this School of Business Administra¬tion program.

Fall Book Group
Teach Students How to Learn: Strategies You Can Incorporate Into Any Course to Improve Metacognition, Study Skills, and Motivation

Written by Saundra Yancy
Group led by Elizabeth Evans

Meet 6 Mondays from 2:00-3:00 in R006
September 19, October 3, 17, 31, November 14, 29

Winterm 2017

Getting to “5” on “Well Organized” on Your Course Evaluations: Tools, Tips, and Tricks

Tuesday January 10, 10:30-12:00 in R006
Led By: Michael Borst and Susan Gallanis

During this session, we will share organization tools that can help Faculty use class time efficiently and improve communication with students.

Universal Design for Learning

Thursday January 12, 10:30-12:00 in R006
Led By: Susan Gallanis

This hands-on workshop will explore basic concepts of universal design that can help make your content accessible for all students. Bring your laptop.

Supporting Students with Disabilities: Using Technology to Increase Access

Thursday January 19, 10:30-11:30 in R006
Led by: Kelsey Finkbeiner (LRC) and Susan Gallanis (CELT)

This session explains the Learning Resource Center’s new DSS software program (for students with disabilities that require an accommodation). During the presentation the LRC will focus on this new program, Accessible Information Management (AIM). We will highlight the changes that faculty will encounter, and we will answer any questions about the program and/or DSS. The second portion of the session will focus on making your course more accessible through Universal Design, which is helpful for all students—but is especially helpful for students with disabilities, in particular.

Grant Proposal Writing Workshop

Thursday January 19, 1:00-2:00 in R006
Presented by the Office of Sponsored Programs: Julie Dresen and Dan McCollum

This workshop will cover the role of the OSP and best practices in grant proposal preparation, including budget preparation and working with external partners. Participants will leave with tips that will help them become more successful in securing grant funding.

Introduction to Quantitative and Qualitative Methods (Mixed Method Studies)

Friday January 20, 12:00-1:00 in R006
Led By: Angela Walmsley

This introductory research session is designed for faculty who would like to utilize a mixed methods approach to collect data or evaluate a program. Participants will learn introductory techniques to develop a study that involves both quantitative and qualitative methods.

Spring 2017

Faith, Learning and Vocation: University Spiritual Life Survey Results

Wednesday February 1, 12:00-1:00 in the Lake Shore Room.
Led By: Dr. Tammy Ferry

The University Spiritual Life Survey, administered in Fall 2016 to Mequon traditional undergraduate students, looks at how our students see themselves, how they see us, and how we support them. In this session, we will consider:

  • How do we contribute to our students’ growth in faith?
  • How do our students see themselves in relation to God? To others?
  • Where might we improve to provide students with an even better experience?

CELT Faculty Book Group (Spring 2017)

Mondays, 2:00 to 3:00pm in R006
5 meetings: Feb 13, Feb 27, March 20, March 27, April 10
Lead by: Elizabeth Evans

Join colleagues for discussion and application of the book “Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World” by Cal Newport.

Review: “In Deep Work, author and professor Cal Newport flips the narrative on impact in a connected age. Instead of arguing distraction is bad, he instead celebrates the power of its opposite. Dividing this books into two parts, the author first makes the case that in almost any profession, cultivating a deep work ethic will produce massive benefits. He then presents a rigorous training regimen, presented as a series of four “rules” for transforming your mind and habits to support this skill.”

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Scholarship and Service – Was Globalization Even Inevitable?

Wednesday February 8, 11:45-12:30 in the Lake Shore Room
Led By: Van Mobley, with Dan McCollum and Dr. Elizabeth Evans

The talk will discuss why voters in the United States, Britain, and other European countries are increasingly skeptical of expansive free trade bills, supranational organizations like the EU and the UN, and unlimited immigration.  It argues that the drive toward a cosmopolitan, borderless world which has now foundered was a twentieth century phenomenon fueled by the end of the cold war. The vision of a post-cold war borderless world was, in retrospect, utopian, and hence bound to fail. It is unclear what, precisely, will emerge as an appropriate twenty-first century objective but the talk will provide some suggestions concerning the direction of the emerging debate.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. 45 minutes at lunchtime in the Lakeshore Room. Bring your own lunch; dessert provided by the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP). Register for each program to let us know you are coming.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Scholarship and Service “Providing Caregiver Wellness through Telehealth”

Monday, February 13, 11:45-12:30pm
Led By: Katrina Serwe

During this presentation for faculty staff and students, new PhD, Katrina Serwe, will share an overview of her recent dissertation research translating a caregiver wellness program in the face-to-face environment to telehealth. Dr. Serwe will share her research purpose, methods, results, directions for a continued line of research, and end with time for questions and discussion of ideas.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Copyright and Fair Use for Faculty

Thursday February 16, 12:00-1:00 in the Lake Shore Room
Led By: Kathy Nowak and Susan Gallanis

Session covers a general overview of copyright, fair use exceptions, and some practical examples. Includes lunch for faculty who register in advance.

Interviewing Individuals/Leading Focus Groups in Qualitative Research

Thursday February 23, 12:00-1:00 in R006
Led by Angela Walmsley

Participants will learn the techniques for creating a study involving interviews as the primary data collection. This includes creating an interview protocol for interviewing individuals and/or leading focus groups. Qualitative techniques such as sampling, transcribing, and coding will also be reviewed. Participants should bring draft interview questions if they are working on a study or considering a particular project involving interviews.

Twenty-minute Topics: The Paradox of Three Biblical Themes with Dan Paavola

Thursday February 23, 1:00 to 2:00pm in R006

Watch a 20 minute video on a Lutheran topic and discuss with the developer/presenter. This is part of a new project between CELT and OCDE to develop Faith, Learning and Vocation content that can be used at a distance; through “flipped delivery” with follow-up discussion board or face-to-face session; or as with this session, watching the video together followed by conversation on the topic. Open to all faculty.

Student Life Invites You to Honor One Another (H1A): Free Speech and Academic Freedom vs. Title IX: What Can I Say or Do?

Wednesday, March 01, 12:00-1:00pm in Lake Shore Room
Led by Steve Gerner and Andy Luptak

During this session for faculty and staff (there is a limit of 35), Andy Luptak and Steve Gerner will highlight our campus-wide campaign entitled, “Honor One Another” or “H1A”. In Romans 10:12 (NIV) the apostle Paul writes “Be devoted to one another in love. Honor one another above yourselves.” As a part of honoring one another, how do we treat one another when issues of free speech and academic freedom arise? What’s appropriate in dealing with students? Bring your questions and learn from each other as we explore these important topics in university life. Free lunch to faculty and staff who register in advance.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Scholarship and Service – Does an Acute Bout of Exercise Decrease Pain in Adults?

Wednesday March 8, 11:45-12:30 in the Lake Shore Room
Led By: Kathy Lemley, with Dan McCollum and Dr. Elizabeth Evans

Pain perception has been shown to be temporarily reduced in adults following an acute bout of exercise. But the impact of exercise may differ based upon the population in question. This talk will discuss some of the factors that influence the exercise response and the possible clinical implications of such differences.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. 45 minutes at lunchtime in the Lakeshore Room. Bring your own lunch; dessert provided by the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP). Register for each program to let us know you are coming.

Twenty–minute Topics: Law and Gospel with John Oberdeck

Thursday March 9, 2:00 to 3:00pm in R006

Watch a 20 minute video on a Lutheran topic and discuss with the developer/presenter. This is part of a new project between CELT and OCDE to develop Faith, Learning and Vocation content that can be used at a distance; through “flipped delivery” with follow-up discussion board or face-to-face session; or as with this session, watching the video together followed by conversation on the topic. Open to all faculty.

Twenty-minute Topics: Lutheran Understanding of Vocation with Tom Feiertag

Thursday March 23, 3:00-4:00 in R006

Watch a 20 minute video on a Lutheran topic and discuss with the developer/presenter. This is part of a new project between CELT and OCDE to develop Faith, Learning and Vocation content that can be used at a distance; through “flipped delivery” with follow-up discussion board or face-to-face session; or as with this session, watching the video together followed by conversation on the topic. Open to all faculty.

Service Learning Lunch n’ Learn

Wednesday April 5, 12:00-1:00 in the Lake Shore Room
Led by Randy Ferguson, and Faculty from several disciplines.

This program is for faculty. Incorporating service learning into your teaching requires advance planning but can result in significant gains for students. Colleen Fenno (English), Travis Suss (Pharmacy Practice), Tim Macafee (Communication), and Lois Harrison (Physical Therapy) will share their approaches and Randy Ferguson (Director, Christan Service) will share information on Concordia resources available to support service learning.

Introduction to SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences)

Wednesday April 5, 3:30-4:30 in R006
Led by Angela Walmsley

Participants will learn the basics of the statistical software package, SPSS. This will include how to set up a database and enter data; and how to run descriptive statistics; create some graphs; code and recode data; and run a few common statistical tests (such as correlation and the t-test). It is highly recommended that participants have SPSS installed on their computer by IT prior to the session and come to the session with their laptop.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Scholarship and Service – Problem-Based Learning Inter-Disciplinary Experience

Thursday April 6, 11:45-12:30 in the Lake Shore Room
Led By: Robert Barnhart, Linda Hensel, Christine Moser, Wanda Routier, Meghan Watry-Christian, with Dan McCollum and Dr. Elizabeth Evans

Faculty from the Schools of Education and Health Professions collaborated to create an interactive learning experience requiring students from multiple disciplines to work together to problem solve. Interdisciplinary groups of students participate in a 3-session, problem-based learning (PBL) case with faculty from both schools serving as facilitators. The research study was designed to measure shifts in interprofessional attitudes and understandings of participants. Discussion will include application of Problem-Based Learning projects to other disciplines.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. 45 minutes at lunchtime in the Lakeshore Room. Bring your own lunch; dessert provided by the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP). Register for each program to let us know you are coming.

SASS Lunch n’ Learn: Academic Success Initiatives

Monday, April 10, 12:00-1:00 (program starts at 12:10) in the Lake Shore Room
Led by: Andy Miller, Celeste Delbar, and Ben Rohde

Student Academic Support Services (SASS) is comprised of Academic Advising, Career Services, and the Learning Resource Center. We invite faculty and academic staff to learn about how SASS is supporting faculty and the University in helping students persist to graduation. We will be discussing the new early alert system (including the faculty referral process), our revamped programming for students on probation, and how data analytics is improving our services. Hear how you, as a faculty member, can continue to collaborate with SASS on our mission to cultivate student success.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Scholarship and Service- Information Literacy Skills of Non-traditional RN Students

Thursday, April 13, 11:45-12:30 in the Lake Shore Room
Led by: John Dyson with Dr. Leah Dvorak

This program for faculty, staff and students, provides a summary of the planning, implementation, and results of John Dyson’s PhD recent dissertation study of practicing non-traditional registered nursing students. The study evaluated their self-perceived and actual measured levels of information literacy (IL) skills. These skills are vital for informing professional nursing practice and effective teaching of patients and families. Recommendations for planned future study will be included.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. 45 minutes at lunchtime in the Lakeshore Room. Bring your own lunch if you wish. Register to let us know you are coming to any sessions you plan to attend.

Seeding Grass-Roots Discussions: Fostering Faculty and Administrator Engagement with Mission, Identity, and External Constituencies

Wednesday April 26, 12:00-1:00 in the Lake Shore Room
Presented by Susan Mobley and Brian Harries

During this session, the presenters will discuss the history of Lutheran higher education in North America (particularly the LCMS), the educational landscape of the U.S. and how Concordia, with its unique institutional history, fits into these two larger contexts.

Advanced Grants Workshop: How to Fund Your Passion and Increase Your Scholarship Activity

Monday May 22, 1:00-2:00 in R006
Led by Julie Dresen (Director, Office of Sponsored Programs), Dan McCollum (Assistant Director, Office of Sponsored Programs – Post Award), Cathy Melan (Director of Grants, Advancement)

During this session for faculty, participants will bring their project or program ideas to this one hour workshop. They will hear from current Concordia faculty who secured funding for their projects and learn how to locate funding as well as steps to apply and identify collaborators.

2017 Concordia Faculty Institute on the Mequon Campus

Tuesday, May 23 Sessions

9:00am to 10:30am – Blackboard Collaborate: Web-conferencing, Online Office Hours and Groups
with Susan Gallanis (CELT) and Margie Blodgett (OCDE)
This session is for all faculty (online, face-to-face and blended). This will be a hands-on workshop (bring your laptop) where you will learn how to set up and navigate Blackboard Learn Collaborate. Participants will also learn how to set up a virtual web-conference session to meet synchronously with students, and learn how to set up groups so students can virtually (without the instructor) to work on projects.
Link to handout: Bb Collaborate Session 04112017
Link to additional Blackboard Collaborate resources

10:45am – Noon – Hands-on with Blackboard Grade Center
with Susan Gallanis, CELT
This session is primarily for faculty who set up and maintain the Grade Center in their course in Blackboard. This hands-on session (bring your laptop) will include troubleshooting, a brief review of a percentage-based grade center and describe the most common problems faculty encounter in setting it up to calculate according to the syllabus. Bring your questions and/or your course syllabus to get started with setting up the grade center for an upcoming course.
Link to Grade Center Troubleshooting Tips: Grade Center Tips 05152017
Link to more Blackboard Learn resources

1:15 – 3:15pm – Getting to 5 on “Being Organized”
with Mike Borst (OT) and Susan Gallanis, CELT
This session is primarily for faculty who teach face-to-face or blended courses. During this session you will learn about organization tools that help faculty use class time efficiently and improve communication with students.

Wednesday May 24 Sessions

9:00am – Noon – Spiritual Vitality: Our Students, Our School, and the Role You Play
with Steve Smith, Campus Pastor and Tammy Ferry, Institutional Research
This session is primarily for faculty who teach on campus. Developing students spiritually and in their vocations are important university goals here at Concordia. Faculty are a vital part of student development. What can you do to support student spiritual growth? Includes a quick review of the data from the University Spiritual Life Survey administered to traditional undergraduate students at Mequon in the Fall 2016. Session includes Chapel and a break.
Link to PowerPoint: UnivSpiritualLife_cuw_2017_01

1:15pm – 3:15pm – Understanding Your Course Ratings…What to Note and What to Ignore
with Paul Wangerin and Tammy Ferry from Institutional Research
This session is for all faculty. The presenters will help you understand the framework used to create and analyze the new rating form that students complete in Course Eval first implemented in Fall of 2016. Paul will also share any initial trends in online vs. face-to-face courses.
Link to PowerPoint: Mequon Faculty Institute- Understanding Your Course Ratings