Pregnant and Parenting: Supporting Our Students

This program was presented at Concordia University Wisconsin, Mequon campus on Monday March 9, 2020. Below is program description and resources.

Pregnant and Parenting: Supporting Our Students
Monday March 9th, 2020  12:10 to 1:00pm Lakeshore Room, Mequon Campus
With Elizabeth Polzin (AVP – Student Success), Jan Chapman (Director, ARC), and Amber Schiessl, Director of Graduate Enrollment. Introduced by Mercedes Fisher.

This program is for faculty and staff.

Today’s students include many who are “post-traditional” in at least one respect, such as students who are veterans, parents, 25 years of age or older, or work full time while attending school. These students are undergraduate as well as graduate students, and may be found on campus, online and in our accelerated programs. Nationally, 26% of all postsecondary students in the U.S. are parents (PPNI, 2018) https://pnpi.org/post-traditional-students/

During this session, we will consider how to support and encourage success among students who are pregnant and parenting. Topics include policies and resources for pregnant students, resources for student parents, stories from student parents, and effective institutional and instructional practices that support pregnant or parenting students. Free lunch is available for the first 20 faculty and staff who register.

This is the first in a series of quarterly Lunch ‘n Learns focusing on strategies to align post-traditional learners with students success. Post-traditional learners have been a growing presence in America’s postsecondary education institutions since the late 1970s and now makeup close to 60 percent of enrolled undergraduates. Post-traditional learners are students who frequently must balance life, work, and education. These students are typically ages 25 and older, care for dependents, are veterans or in the military, and work full time while enrolled.

For more information on this program, contact Elizabeth Evans, Director of CELT at X 4283 or elizabeth.evans@cuw.edu

Resources:

Concordia University Policy Pregnant and Parenting https://www.cuw.edu/about/offices/title-ix-sexual-harassment-policies/_assets/PregnantParentingStudentsPolicy.pdf

Building Family-Friendly Campuses: Strategies to Promote College Success Among Student Parents from American Council on Education  https://www.higheredtoday.org/2017/06/12/building-family-friendly-campuses-strategies-promote-college-success-among-student-parents/

Pregnant and Parenting PPT March 9, 2020

Christian Faith: On Prayer

Christian Faith: On Prayer with Dan Paavola  

Wednesday February 26, 12:10-1:00pm in the Lakeshore Room

Prayer expresses our relationship with God, strengthening our tie with Him as we trust and exercise His promises. In prayer we tell God our worries and ask for His answers. But we also celebrate His past and future care of us by giving Him thanks. In this lunch-and-learn presentation, Dan Paavola will lead us in a discussion on the gift of prayer. Please join us as we share how we pray and the wonderful answers God provides.

This series related to our Christian Faith Global Learning Outcome is for faculty and instructional staff.

Materials related to this program:

PowerPoint: CELT INTRODUCTION TO PRAYER, Feb. 2020

Handout: CELT INTRODUCTION TO PRAYER–Feb. 2020

CELT Programs at CUW – Spring 2020

Faculty Book Group White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

Thursdays from 10:00 – 11:00am on February 6, 20, 27, March 5, 12, 2020

Co-facilitated by Drs. Ken Harris and Elizabeth Polzin

Deadline to register: Thursday, January 30.

While most of us have likely completed a course on multiculturalism or have been required to engage in cultural competence training, few of us have arenas where we can directly converse on the topic of racism. As a predominately white institution and as Christian citizens, it is imperative that we increase our ‘racial stamina’, the ability to which we can engage in conversations regarding race. Join us for discussion regarding the book White Fragility. Throughout our conversations, we will seek to understand how to engage constructively with respect to racial issues and best serve our neighbors as we reflect on our role in this critical conversation.  Book is included. Limited to the first 15 participants to register.

Thanks for the Feedback Book Group

Six sessions from Noon – 1:00pm on Fridays in R006

February 7, 14; March 6, 27; April 3, and 17, 2020

Facilitators:  Darcy Paape, Women’s Leadership Institute, and Sandra Jahns, Communication Department.

Deadline to register is Thursday, January 30 or when the limit is reached.

This book group for faculty and staff focuses on Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well by Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen. Not focused on giving feedback, where the conversation often starts, this book offers suggestions of frameworks and mindsets we can use to receive feedback so that we can best learn from it. We might also be able to use these ideas to help students receive constructive feedback.  The leaders will offer thought-provoking biblical applications throughout the study. This group will meet in R006. Please bring your brown bag lunch if you wish; CELT will provide a cold beverage. There is a limit of 15 participants.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Drs. Aaron Moldenhauer and Sheri Bunyan

Monday February 10, 12:10 – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room

  • Rev. Dr. Aaron Moldenhauer, Assistant Professor of Theology, recently received his Ph.D. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University in Evanston IL.  He will talk about his research related to his dissertation “Luther’s Doctrine of Christ: Language, Metaphysics, Logic.”
  • Dr. Sheri Bunyan, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy, recently completed her Ph.D. in Exercise and Rehabilitation Science from Marquette University.  She will talk about her research related to her dissertation “Submaximal Isometric Force Steadiness in People with Multiple Sclerosis Under Single and Dual Task Conditions.”

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty and staff projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. Faculty, staff and students are welcome at attend. Up to 15 free lunches are available for faculty who register in advance.

Christian Faith: On Prayer with Dan Paavola

Wednesday February 26, 12:10-1:00pm in the Lakeshore Room

Prayer expresses our relationship with God, strengthening our tie with Him as we trust and exercise His promises. In prayer we tell God our worries and ask for His answers. But we also celebrate His past and future care of us by giving Him thanks. In this lunch-and-learn presentation, Dan Paavola will lead us in a discussion on the gift of prayer. Please join us as we share how we pray and the wonderful answers God provides.

This series related to our Christian Faith Global Learning Outcome is for faculty and instructional staff.
15 free lunches are available for faculty who register in advance. Get your lunch from the cafeteria and bring it to the Lakeshore Room.

Concordia Faculty Seminar – Drs. Brenda Ulmen and Steve Taylor

Thursday February 27, 12:10-1pm in the Lakeshore Room
Introductions by Dr. Leah Dvorak

  • Dr. Steve Taylor, Vice President of Student Life, recently received his Ed.D in Higher Education from Concordia University Portland. He will talk about his research related to his dissertation “Professional Mentoring at a Christian Predominantly White Institution: Impacts on the Social Connections of African-American Students”
  • Dr. Brenda Ulmen, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing in Mequon recently completed her PhD in Leadership in Higher Education from Northcentral University. She will talk about her research related to her dissertation “Compassion Fatigue, Resilience, and Intent to Stay: A Quantitative Study Among Nurse Educators”.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty and staff projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. Faculty, staff and students are welcome at attend. Up to 15 free lunches are available for faculty who register in advance.

Spring 2020 Blackboard and Respondus Sessions

Blackboard Basics with Gradebook with Susan Gallanis

Wednesday January 22, 1:00 – 2:30 in Rincker 006

This program is ideal for new faculty or any faculty who want to improve their understanding of the Blackboard Grade Center. In addition to the Grade Center, participants will learn how to add the three most common content types, create an assignment/drop box, and open the course for students. Participants are encouraged to bring their syllabus and laptop.

Blackboard Tests and Respondus with Justin Frisque

Wednesday January 22, 3:00 – 4:00 in Rincker 006

Faculty will learn how to set up a Blackboard test, including 5 question types. The second part of the program will cover how to use Respondus LockDown Browser, a tool that enhances test integrity and discourages cheating. Bring your laptop.

Blackboard Basics with Susan Gallanis

Tuesday February 11, 8:00 – 9:00 am in R006 or via Zoom.

This program is ideal for new faculty or any faculty wishing to improve their understanding of the Blackboard Grade Center. In addition to the Grade Center, participants will learn how to add the three most common content types, create an assignment/drop box, and open the course for students.

This session is available face-to-face, as well as via webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Blackboard Tests and Rubrics with Justin Frisque

Wednesday February 19, 10:00 – 11:00 am in R006 or via Zoom

This session is for faculty. Learn how to create online tests using a variety of test questions. Learn how to create electronic rubrics you can attach to drop boxes and other assignments.

This session is available face-to-face, as well as via webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Blackboard Portfolios with Susan Gallanis

Monday March 9, 2:00 – 3:00 pm in R006 or via Zoom

Faculty will learn how to set up a digital portfolio using Blackboard including how to create a template, add course and personal artifacts, share a portfolio, and set up a Portfolio assignment in your course.

This session is available face-to-face, as well as via webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

CELT Programs at CUW – January 2020

CUW Scholarship Boot camp Winter 2020

Thursday January 9, 8:00am – 4:30pm

Sponsored by the Scholarship Committee and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

Come to Pharmacy 132 for a quiet place to work on your faculty scholarship projects, including your advanced study courses and dissertations. Sign up for the hours you plan to attend. Sign up for support with writing/editing, research design, or statistical planning and analysis. Let us know in the registration if you want a sandwich at lunchtime.

The goal of this time is to produce tangible work. We provide the space, snacks, beverages, a sandwich at lunchtime, and you supply the focus and attention to projects. The last day to register is Wednesday January 8 at Noon.

Writing/editing support, research design support and statistical planning and analysis support will be available. There are also two presentations connected to this event:

  • 11:00 – 11:30am Writing an Abstract with Jeff Walz (part of registration below)
  • 2:00 – 3:00pm CIRG Workshop with Julie Dresen and Rachel Heil. (separate registration)

Please contact Julie Dresen x2794 or Elizabeth Evans x4283 with questions.

CIRG Workshop: To to apply for the CIRG Research Grant (Concordia Intramural Teaching Grant)

Thursday January 9, 2:00 – 3:00pm in Pharmacy 147

Presenters: Julie Dresen and Rachel Heil from the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

Applications are due February 1, 2020. The following topics will be covered:

  • Budget Development (Ensuring your budget is appropriate, addresses necessary resources, and is justified)
  • Objectives and Outcomes (Developing objectives and goals, assessment of processes and outcomes)
  • Efficient and professional writing (Ensuring that your proposal is concise, specific, and clearly communicates your intent)

    Please contact Julie Dresen x 2794 with questions.

Improve Students’ Writing Skills: Develop an Writing-Intensive Course

Tuesday January 14, 10:00am – Noon in R006

This workshop is for faculty who are teaching or thinking about teaching a writing-intensive course. Participants will learn how a course is designated as writing intensive and the pedagogy that informs this initiative. We will also share and discuss resources and possible approaches to developing a writing-intensive course. Participants are encouraged to bring a writing assignment they are developing or currently using.

Designing Your Course Syllabus with Catherine Robertson and Elizabeth Evans

Wednesday January 15, 10:30 – Noon in R006

Create or revise your course and syllabus with updated course learning outcomes that connect to your activities and assessments as well as program learning outcomes (PLOs) and global learning outcomes (GLOs). For new or returning faculty. Includes syllabus template and Top 10 syllabus problems. Bring your laptop.

Course Design for Student Success

Thursday January 16, 10:00 – Noon in R006

Presenters: Susan Gallanis and Elizabeth Polzin

This program is for faculty who want to learn how principles of Universal Design can impact student success. Participants will learn how tools in Microsoft Word can enhance student’s ability to access content in multiple formats with a new Blackboard enhancement called Ally.

Using Zoom in Your Teaching

Thursday January 23, 9:00 – 10:15am in R005

Presenters: Elizabeth Evans, Justin Frisque, Susan Gallanis

This program is for faculty who teach a face-to-face class on the Mequon campus. Participants will learn how Zoom works in the classroom such as when a laptop cart is used. We will discuss teaching and student engagement considerations involving Zoom. Specific application scenarios will be included such as a guest speaker, snow day, or if the instructor is unable to come to campus.

Designing Your Course and Syllabus

Below are resources related to this program presented by Elizabeth Evans and Kate Robertson on January 15, 2020.

1A- Jan 2020 Syllabus Workshop

1B-Instructional Script Jan 2020

1C- Syllabus Workshop Outline January 2020

5- Rev Global Learning Outcomes Diagram Nov 1, 2018

6-University Liberal Arts Outcomes and Proficiencies-4

7- PLOs to GLOs CurriculumMap-Example_MS-Leadership

8- Effective Instruction at CU Model Color 14 Feb 2018 E Evans

9- Rev Bloom’s Taxonomy Triangle (Color)

10- BloomsTaxonomyVerbs

11- Blooms Taxonomy Wheel Color

12- revised-blooms-chart and questioning strategies

18- Spring 2020 Dates

19- CU Faculty Handbook Policies on LMS

The information on the syllabus template, instructions, writing a good course description, the credit hour, behavioral language, and connecting to the Global Learning Outcomes is here http://celt.cuw.edu/syllabus-template-and-instructions/

For samples of well-written syllabi, please contact Elizabeth Evans at elizabeth.evans@cuw.edu

November 2019 Center Faculty Webinar

On November 4, 2019, Dan Paavola (Theology Faculty) discussed with Center Faculty, the three themes from his recent book “Grace, Faith, Scripture: Portrait of a Lutheran” (2019).

Link to video recording

PowerPoint

About his book: Grace, faith, and Scripture. These three solas, or “alones”,  have long been used to characterize the unique theology of the Lutheran faith. The solas set up a relationship between God and us and between us and our neighbor.

Using stories and situations drawn from common relationships such as friendships and marriage, Daniel Paavola uses the three solas to deepen our understanding of Lutheran doctrine. The solas don’t encompass every single aspect of Lutheranism, but through them, we can get a picture of what it means to be a Lutheran.

CELT Programs at CUW – Fall 2019

Global Learning Outcome #1 Christian Faith is the Focus GLO for 2019-2020
Please join us for this program to develop your understanding of Christian Faith.

What it Means to Be Lutheran – Employee Book Study

with Rev. Dr. Dan Paavola on his book “Grace, Faith, Scripture: Portrait of a Lutheran” (2019).

All staff and faculty are welcome.
The book study will occur in three sessions in the Terrace Room Noon to 1pm.

  • Thursday September 26, 2019
  • Wednesday October 9, 2019
  • Thursday October 17, 2019

This book study Includes the option of lunch through the cafeteria line, and a copy of the book.

You must register in advance to participate. Deadline to register is Thursday September 12 at 5pm. If you cannot attend all sessions, indicate that when you register. [Registration is closed]

You need to be registered to attend at least one session to obtain a copy of the book. Those not already owning the book will be notified when the books are available in R008, the CELT Office.

Advance Reading: Read Part I of the book prior to September 26, Part II prior to October 9, and Part III prior to October 17.

Concordia Faculty Seminar – Drs. Watry-Christian and Daugherty

Monday, September 9, Noon – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Introduced by Leah Dvorak

Meghan Watry-Christian, Occupational Therapy Department, School of Health Professions at Mequon, recently completed her Ph.D. in Special Education from Northcentral University. She will talk about her research related to her dissertation, “Exploring Postsecondary Transition Factors Related to Quality of Life in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders.”

Dr. Ryan Daugherty, Social Science Department, School of Arts and Sciences at Mequon, recently completed his Ph.D. at the University of Kansas in Political Science. He will talk his research related to his dissertation, “Challenge of Ethnicity? Ethnic Diversity and Democratic Representation.”

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. Faculty, staff and students are welcome at attend. Up to 15 free lunches are available for faculty who register in advance.

Let’s Talk About GLO #1 Christian Faith and Education with Brad Alles, School of Education

Tuesday September 10, 3:00pm to 4:00pm Central

Location: LU006 Media Viewing Room on the Mequon Campus or use Zoom on your own computer.

This session is an introduction to integrating faith into life, teachable moments, and classroom content, giving brief examples used in education courses from philosophy, psychology, sociology, law, politics, economics, and history.

A Conversation About Writing-Intensive Courses with Sally Canapa

Thursday September 12, Noon – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room

This program will provide faculty who are now teaching a writing-intensive course, or are contemplating teaching such a course in the future, an opportunity to learn about the pedagogy informing this initiative. Possible approaches will be presented and discussed, and faculty will have the opportunity to offer their ideas and ask questions.

This is the first of two Fall programs that address designing and teaching writing-intensive courses and are also related to Global Learning Outcome (GLO) #5 – Communicative Fluency. Faculty do not need to attend both workshops. Up to 15 free lunches are available for faculty who register in advance.

Measuring Student Learning for Program GLOs and NetVUE Learning Activities with Elizabeth Evans and Susan Gallanis

Monday, September 30, Noon – 1:00pm in the Lakeshore Room

Intended Audience:
1. Faculty or instructional staff working on program assessment
2. NetVUE Participants.

As a follow up to the August 15th session on TEACHING, LEARNING and EVALUATION through the Global Learning Outcomes (GLOs), program assessment coordinators are invited to learn more the rubrics that can be connected in Blackboard to collect data on GLO #5 Communicative Fluency and GLO #1 Christian Faith, and potentially other GLOs. NetVUE Grant Participants will learn more about the various options for connecting their grading of student learning activities to the reporting process for this grant in Blackboard.

Let’s Talk About GLO #1 Christian Faith and Ethics with Kevin Voss, Philosophy Department

Tuesday October 1, 3:00 – 4:00 pm Central / 4:00 – 5:00 pm Eastern

Location: LU006 Media Viewing Room on the Mequon Campus and Zoom to SCI 102 on the Ann Arbor Campus, or use Zoom on your own computer.

The study of Ethics offers a natural place to introduce important elements of the Christian faith. Simple tips will be provided on how instructors and program directors can apply basic Christian teaching to problems and moral dilemmas in a helpful, nonthreatening manner.

Designing Writing-Intensive Courses: Writing to Learn with Sally Canapa

Thursday October 3, Noon – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room

This program for faculty will include “hands-on” crafting of discipline-specific writing assignments for writing-intensive courses. Concerns and questions will also be addressed.

This is the second of two Fall programs that address designing and teaching writing-intensive courses and are also related to Global Learning Outcome (GLO) #5 – Communicative Fluency. Faculty can attend this program even if they didn’t attend the first session in September. Up to 15 free lunches are available for faculty who register in advance.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Near-Real-Time Calibration for Early Warning Gravitational-wave Astronomy with Aaron Viets

Thursday October 10, 12:15 – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Sponsored by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP)

In August of 2017, the Advanced LIGO detectors observed gravitational waves from a binary neutron star merger for the first time in history. Two seconds after the merger, a short gamma ray burst, one of the most energetic events in the known universe, was detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, confirming the long-believed theory that short gamma-ray bursts result from binary neutron star mergers. This detection also taught us just how fast we have to respond to these events in order to maximize scientific results – within a few seconds! This means that the data is acquired, calibrated, and searched, events are sent to astronomers, and telescopes are pointed, all within seconds of the signal’s arrival. In this talk, I will discuss the methods used to calibrate the data and the challenges of achieving the goal to produce calibrated data in about 1 second.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. Faculty, staff and students are welcome at attend. Up to 10 free lunches are available for faculty who register in advance.

Achieving an Institution-Wide Culture and Practice in Undergraduate Research Best Practices

Tuesday October 22, Noon – 1:00 PM in the Lakeshore Room

The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs invites you to attend a webinar titled, “Achieving an Institution-Wide Culture and Practice in Undergraduate Research Best Practices” presented by the 2016 Award for Undergraduate Research Accomplishments (AURA) recipients. Lunch will be provided for the first 15 faculty who sign up.

Let’s Talk About GLO #1 Christianity and Worldviews: Models of Engagement with Angus Menuge, Philosophy Department

Tuesday October 22, 3:00 – 4:00 pm Central / 4:00 – 5:00 pm Eastern

Location: LU006 Media Viewing Room on the Mequon Campus and Zoom to SCI 102 on the Ann Arbor Campus, or use Zoom on your own computer.

During this session, Dr. Menuge plans to explain what worldviews are; present some of the different models Christians use for engaging non-Christian worldviews; identify and defend the model(s) of engagement that are most biblical; review some examples, e.g. scientism and postmodernism.

Concordia Faculty Seminar – Anatomy Education with Reivian Berrios Barillas

Wednesday November 13, 12:15 – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Sponsored by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP)

How did anatomy education research assist in improving my pedagogy? Learn about my anatomy education investigations and the CELT opportunity afforded to me through the Concordia Intramural Teaching Grant.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. Faculty, staff and students are welcome at attend. Up to 10 free lunches are available for faculty who register in advance.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Dr. Delwiche, School of Nursing

Thursday November 14, Noon – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Introductions by Dr. Leah Dvorak

Dr. Jennifer Delwiche, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing in Mequon, recently completed her PhD in Nursing from Marquette University. She will talk about her research related to her dissertation “Identifying a History of Nonfatal Strangulation: What Impacts Screening by Healthcare, Law Enforcement and Advocates?”

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. Faculty, staff and students are welcome at attend. Up to 15 free lunches are available for faculty who register in advance.

Fall Blackboard and Respondus Sessions

Blackboard Basics with Susan Gallanis

Wednesday September 11, Noon – 1:00 pm in R006 or via Zoom
This session is for faculty. Learn how to log in and find your courses, add a folder, upload a document, create an Assignment (“drop box”), set up the grade center, open course for students, copy a course.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Blackboard Tests and Rubrics with Justin Frisque

Wednesday September 18, Noon – 1:00 pm in R006 or via Zoom
This session is for faculty. Learn how to create online tests using a variety of test questions. Learn how to create electronic rubrics you can attach to drop boxes and other assignments.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Respondus LockDown Browser with Susan Gallanis

Wednesday October 2, Noon – 1:00 pm in R006 or via Zoom
This program is for faculty. Learn how to use Respondus LockDown Browser, a deterrent to cheating, for a test in Blackboard when the instructor is in the room during the test. When using LockDown Browser, students cannot print, make screen captures, access other web pages, or access other applications while taking the exam.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Blackboard Test and Rubrics with Justin Frisque

Monday October 7, 3:00 – 4:00 pm in R006 or via Zoom
This session is for faculty. Learn how to create online tests using a variety of test questions. Learn how to create electronic rubrics you can attach to drop boxes and other assignments.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Blackboard More Tools with Justin Frisque

Monday October 14, 1:00 – 2:00 pm in R006 or via Zoom
This session is for faculty. Learn how to embed YouTube videos, discussion forums, email/course messages, and add the Panopto tool.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Blackboard Tests and Rubrics with Susan Gallanis

Tuesday November 19, 8:30 – 9:30 am in R006 or via Zoom
This session is for faculty. Learn how to create online tests using a variety of test questions. Learn how to create electronic rubrics you can attach to drop boxes and other assignments.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Respondus LockDown Browser with Justin Frisque

Tuesday December 10, Noon – 1:00 pm in R006 or via Zoom
This program is for faculty. Learn how to use Respondus LockDown Browser, a deterrent to cheating, for a test in Blackboard when the instructor is in the room during the test. When using LockDown Browser, students cannot print, make screen captures, access other web pages, or access other applications while taking the exam.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.