CELT Programs – Summer 2019

CUW Scholarship Boot Camp Summer 2019

Wednesday, May 29 and Thursday, May 30 – 8:00 to 4:30 in Pharmacy 132

Come to a quiet place to work on your faculty scholarship projects, including your advanced study courses and dissertations. Sign up for the hours and days you plan to attend. Come as you are; arrive and leave as you need to.

Writing support, research design support, statistical planning and analysis support, and support for developing a CITG Grant will be available for some part of each of the days. Jeff Walz will offer an interactive talk in writing abstracts at 2:00pm on Wednesday.

The goal of this time is to produce tangible work. We provide the space, snacks, beverages, and lunch. You supply the focus and attention to projects.

PH 132 will be the quiet space away from your phone and interruptions. The room will be open from 8am to 4:30 each day. You are encouraged to stay all day to get maximum benefit.

Sponsored by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs and supported by CELT
Please call Julie Dresen x2794 or Elizabeth Evans x4283 with questions.

Faith, Learning and Scholarship Faculty Development Session 4/29/2019

Faith, Learning and Scholarship Faculty Development Session
Lunch and Learn at Mequon or via Zoom

Monday April 29, 12:10pm—1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room or via Zoom
with Angela Walmsley, Elizabeth Evans and Jason Lane

Concordia, as a Christian Lutheran community, can be the leader in faith and learning scholarship. Join the over 40 full-time faculty who are already doing scholarship on faith. Get together with others interested in developing a teaching and learning scholarship project around faith, service, or vocation for 2019-2020. We will form a faculty learning community to support one another in our learning and accountability in completing our goals. Learn how the CITG grant can support this work with a $500 stipend. Free lunch for the first 20 faculty who register in advance to attend in person at Mequon. Get your lunch and bring it to the Lakeshore Room starting as early as 11:45. There is also an option to attend by Zoom.

Handouts for today’s session:

Here is another article of interest
Smith, D. Ed., Um, J., & Beversluis, C. . (2014). The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in A Christian Context. Christian Higher Education, 13(1), 74–87.
CUW Library Permalink http://cuw.ezproxy.switchinc.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,cpid&custid=s3443150&db=eue&AN=93350915&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Contact the CELT for further information on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and Faith and Learning at x2358 or Elizabeth.evans@cuw.edu

CELT Programs at CUAA Spring 2019

Scholarly Communication: Tools to Measure Journal Impact with Elizabeth Hartig

Choose from one of two dates (both sessions are the same): 
Monday February 18, 12:00–1:00 pm in the ARC Testing and Training Room
Thursday February 21, 11:30 — 12:30 pm in the Manor Ballroom

This presentation is for faculty and will cover scholarly metrics or the measurement of the impact of a journal or article. Scholarly metrics helps faculty decide where to publish. This presentation will discuss the benefits and limitations of scholarly metrics. Attendees will be shown tools to find scholarly metrics and a new tool for CUAA, Browzine.

Concordia Faculty Seminar with Mark Looker and Michael Kalmes
27 Degrees of Separation: Social Network Analysis and Literary Texts

Wednesday April 10, 4:00 – 5:00 in Krieger 107

Our project adapts UCINET, a software program for doing advanced social network research, to explore what it might reveal or highlight about the relationships of characters in novels through the lenses of such categories as family, race, gender, social status, and geographical location. The resulting data, once entered into UCINET and pushed through a related program called NETDRAW, provides a unique way to sort out, compare, and visualize social relationships of various kinds in fairly dramatic fashion. 

As we began to see the range of possibilities in adapting UCINET to the analysis of literary texts, it struck us that a) the modifications that we had made to the software might be used with any kind of text, and b) a simplified version of the process could be adapted for use in the classroom as an additional pedagogical tool. In fact, just the process of creating the Excel files—asking students which attributes (e.g., gender, age, race, centrality, and the like) are important to a novel and why, which relationships in a novel are most intense and why, etc., before entering them into an Excel sheet—can stimulate classroom discussion and debate (as borne out by trial runs in two courses during spring 2018 and spring 2019). One of the things we’ve noticed is that such analysis can make readers more sensitive to various kinds of diversity, encouraging them to think about texts in a way that reveals hitherto unlooked for patterns and trends and raises unexpected questions. Given the importance of visual learning in today’s educational environment, the resulting ability to visualize the generated data and make hypotheses about a novel based on that could be a powerful pedagogical tool in middle and secondary English classrooms as well as university-level (with the bonus that a basic version of UCINET is available for free).

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Faculty Book Club: A continuation of What the Best College Teachers Do

Wednesday May 1, 3:30 – 5:00 pm in Krieger 107

The finish line of the spring semester is within sight. Come gather with faculty to talk about your successes and struggles this past term. After thirty minutes, we will move to a discussion of chapters 5 and 6 of this book written by Ken Bains. Those who have not read it are still welcome to stay for the book club meeting, which will begin around 4:00.

Blackboard Courses

CUAA ONLY – Blackboard Basics with Susan Gallanis and Justin Frisque
Tuesday January 22, 10:00 – 11:00 am (ET)

Learn how to log in and find your courses, add a folder, upload a document, create an Assignment (“drop box”), set up the grade center, open course for students, copy a course. This session will be a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. Join from your own computer using Zoom.

CUAA ONLY – Blackboard Tests and Respondus LockDown Browser with Susan Gallanis and Justin Frisque
Thursday January 24, 10:00 – 11:00 am (ET)

This session is for faculty. During the first part of this session, you will learn how to create online tests using a variety of test questions. During the second part of this session, learn how to use Respondus LockDown Browser, a deterrent to cheating, for a test in Blackboard when the instructor is in the room during the test. When using LockDown Browser, students cannot print, make screen captures, access other web pages, or access other applications while taking the exam.

CELT Programs at CUW – Spring 2019

CELT Spring Book Group

Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone: Universal Design for Learning in Higher Education
Led by Janis Chapman (ARC Director) and Susan Gallanis (CELT)

Meets on the following Mondays, 2 – 3 in R006: February 18 & 25, March 11 & 25, April 15 & 29
Register by Wednesday, February 6 to receive the book.

This book group is open to faculty and staff.
Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is often associated with students with disabilities. Thomas J. Tobin and Kirsten T. Behling (the authors) show that UDL can be profitably broadened toward a larger ease-of-use and general diversity framework. Captioned instructional videos, for example, benefit learners with hearing impairments but also the student who worries about waking her young children at night or those studying on a noisy team bus.

Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone is aimed at faculty members, faculty-service staff, disability support providers, student-service staff and campus leaders who want to strengthen the engagement, interaction, and performance of all college students. It includes resources for readers who want to become UDL experts and advocates: real-world case studies, active-learning techniques, UDL coaching skills, micro- and macro-level UDL-adoption guidance, and use-them-now resources.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Student Use of Quantum Mechanical Models

Thursday February 7, 12:15 – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Presented by Dr. Jordan Beck

Brought to you by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP). Free lunch from the cafeteria included for the first 20 people who register in advance for this event.

This program is for faculty, staff and students. Quantum mechanical models are abstract and require navigation of a variety of cognitively taxing representations. Published research about how students use quantum mechanical models at the upper-division level is sparse. This work aims to fill this gap in the literature and begin the process of characterizing learning of quantum chemistry in upper-division courses. The major findings are that upper-division students’ knowledge is significantly fragmented with a retention of determinism and reluctance to apply mathematical formulae. Students, unlike experts, focus on surface features. The data indicates two specific surface features: lexical features and a “complex equals better” heuristic.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Live Magna Outline Seminar: Motivating and Engaging Generation Z Learners with Dr. Corey Seemiller

Tuesday, February 12, 1:00 – 2:00 pm in Pharmacy 147

Generation Z is now in college and they’ve brought a unique set of values and interests with them. If you’re challenged by—or even just curious about—understanding the drive and motivation of the young students in your classes, this online seminar will provide research-based context, understanding, and practical tactics that can be implemented in any classroom. This Magna Online Seminar will be held in a Q&A format. Expect a frank discussion on the characteristics, concerns, values, preferences, and sources of motivation of Generation Z college students and what changes in teaching style will be needed to motivate, engage, and connect with this new breed of student.

Concordia Faculty Seminar – Dr. Haendel and Dr. Polzin

Thursday, February 21, Noon – 1:00pm in the Lakeshore Room

Dr. Angela Haendel, Assistant Professor in the Speech and Language Pathology department in Mequon, recently completed the Interdisciplinary PhD in Speech-Language Pathology & Psychology from Marquette University. She will talk about research related to her dissertation “Changes in Electroencephalogram Coherence in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder after a Social Skills Intervention. “

Dr. Elizabeth Polzin, Assistant Professor of Education and Assistant Vice President of Academics for Student Success, recently completed the Ed.D. in Instructional Leadership, with an emphasis in Higher Education Administration, from Lindenwood University. Dr. Polzin will discuss research she completed related to her study “A correlational study of academic locus of control, study preparation, and the Praxis II.”

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. Faculty, staff and students are welcome at attend. Up to 15 free lunches are available for faculty who register in advance.

A View on Communicative Fluency from the Communication Department

Wednesday, February 27, Noon – 1:00pm in the Lakeshore Room
Presenters: Tim Macafee and Sandra Jahns

Each year we focus on one Global Learning Outcome; this year’s focus is Communicative Fluency. Join Department of Communication faculty to learn about their expertise in communication fluency, communication skills all students need, and how Department of Communication courses meet this Global Learning Outcome.

Concordia Faculty Seminar:A Team-Based Collaborative Care Approach in Clinics

Thursday March 7, 12:15 – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Presented by Dr. Michael Oldani

Brought to you by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP).

This program is for faculty, staff, and students. During this program, Dr. Oldani describes an approach focused on inter-professional team-based collaborative care in clinics with medical cases focusing on hypertension, with diabetes mellitus and other conditions. Programs involved include Pharmacy, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Social Work, and Physician Assistants.

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Service Learning Showcase: How Do I Add Service Learning to my Course?

Wednesday March 27, Noon – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Presenters: Randy Ferguson, Sarah Collins, Lori Woodall, Lois Harrison

Interact with CUW colleagues who have taught service learning courses; we will discuss the logistics, challenges, and benefits associated with incorporating service into your teaching. It can be as simple as adding a service project or as substantial as running service-learning pedagogy throughout the course. Our time together will be dialogical and practical, filled with recent CUW examples.

Diversity, Success & You – Gender Issues

Monday, April 1, Noon – 1:00pm in the Terrace Room
Presenters: Eugene Pitchford and Steve Gerner

“Diversity, Success, & You” with Eugen Pitchford and Steve Gerner This Lunch & Learn is designed to give you the knowledge, tools, and dispositions to effectively facilitate diverse learning environments. An emphasis in this session is on understanding how students’ experiences are impacted by gender and family values. This highly engaging professional development will challenge you to apply this novel learning in your current professional role.

Student Motivation: The Latest Developments in Vocation in Undergraduate Education from NetVUE

Wednesday, April 3, Noon – 1:00pm in the Lakeshore Room
Presenters: Rachel Pickett, Elizabeth Polzin, Tim Macafee, and Ryan Daugherty

Presenters represented Concordia University at the March 2019 Biennial NetVUE Conference (Network of Vocation in Undergraduate Education). They will share portions of their conference presentation on connecting citizenship and vocation in the new core course CCE 130 The Christian Citizen which helps students think about how they might shape the world through Christian service. The presenters will also share highlights from the conference that can be applied to faculty work. You will also get a brief preview of the NetVUE grant CU was recently awarded focusing on vocation and the Global Learning Outcomes.

Concordia Faculty Seminar – Dr. Pease and Dr. Belz

Thursday, April 4, 12:00 – 1:00pm in the Lakeshore Room

Betsy Pease, Assistant Professor of History, recently completed her Ph.D. in History from Indiana University-Bloomington. She will talk about her research related to her dissertation “Good Neighbors: The Great Depression and the Movement to Remake American Communities.”

Angela Belz, a faculty member in CUW’s Batterman School of Business, will talk about her recent research for the Ph.D. in Leadership for the Advancement of Learning at Cardinal Stritch University. Her dissertation title was “Voices from the Ground: Caseworker Perceptions of Margin in Life, W-2 Program Effectiveness and Organizational Support.”

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration. Faculty, staff and students are welcome at attend. Up to 15 free lunches are available for faculty who register in advance.

Concordia Faculty Seminar: Intergenerational Connections – Students Serving Older Adults

Thursday April 18, 12:15 – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room
Presented by Drs. Sharon Chappy, Lois Harrison, and others

Brought to you by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP).

This program is for faculty, staff and students. This project is designed to provide an inter-professional in-home team-based assessment approach for falls risks, medication risks, and mental health screening for seniors receiving “meals on Wheels” in Sheboygan County. This novel approach incorporates an inter-professional and holistic approach to the quality of life and wellbeing of seniors in their homes while exposing students to the realities and challenges the elderly face to remain safe in their homes

Concordia Faculty Seminars are informal interactive presentations and conversations on faculty projects including grants, research, and service designed to promote scholarship, spark new ideas, provide opportunities for meaningful discussion, and increase collaboration.

Faith, Learning and Scholarship Lunch and Learn

Monday April 29, Noon—1:00pm in the Lakeshore Room, Mequon Campus or join via Zoom
With Angela Walmsley, Elizabeth Evans, and Jason Lane

Concordia as a Christian Lutheran community could be the leader in faith and learning scholarship. Join the over 40 full-time faculty who are already doing scholarship on faith. Get together with others interested in developing a teaching and learning scholarship project around faith, service, or vocation for 2019-2020. We will form a faculty learning community to support one another in our learning and accountability in completing our goals. Learn how the CITG grant can support this work with a $500 stipend. Free lunch for the first 20 faculty who register in advance to attend in person. There is also an option to attend by Zoom which will be 12:10 to 1:00pm Central time and 1:10 pm to 2:00pm Eastern Time.

Blackboard Courses

CUW ONLY – Blackboard Basics with Susan Gallanis
Wednesday January 23, 1:00 – 2:00 pm in LU003

Learn how to log in and find your courses, add a folder, upload a document, create an Assignment (“drop box”), set up the grade center, open course for students, copy a course.

This session will be a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. Join from your own computer using Zoom.

CUW ONLY – Blackboard Tests and Rubrics with Justin Frisque

Thursday January 24, Noon – 1:00 pm in LU003

This session is for faculty. Learn how to create online tests using a variety of test questions. Learn how to create electronic rubrics you can attach to drop boxes and other assignments.

CUW ONLY – Respondus LockDown Browser with Susan Gallanis
Thursday January 24, 1:00 – 2:00 pm in LU003

This program is for faculty. Learn how to use Respondus LockDown Browser, a deterrent to cheating, for a test in Blackboard when the instructor is in the room during the test. When using LockDown Browser, students cannot print, make screen captures, access other web pages, or access other applications while taking the exam.

The follows sessions are all offered in Rincker 006 on the Mequon campus.
Participants can also join from their own computer using Zoom.

Blackboard Basics with Justin Frisque
Monday, February 4, 12:00 – 1:00 pm CST in R006

Learn how to log in and find your courses, add a folder, upload a document, create an Assignment (“drop box”), set up the grade center, open course for students, copy a course.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Blackboard Tests and Rubrics with Justin Frisque
Thursday, February 28, 1:00 – 2:00 pm CST in R006

This session is for faculty. Learn how to create online tests using a variety of test questions. Learn how to create electronic rubrics you can attach to drop boxes and other assignments.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Respondus LockDown Browser with Susan Gallanis
Monday, March 4, 10:00 – 11:00 am in R006

This program is for faculty. Learn how to use Respondus LockDown Browser, a deterrent to cheating, for a test in Blackboard when the instructor is in the room during the test. When using LockDown Browser, students cannot print, make screen captures, access other web pages, or access other applications while taking the exam.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Blackboard Basics with Justin Frisque
Wednesday, April 17, 10:00 – 11:00am CST in R006

Learn how to log in and find your courses, add a folder, upload a document, create an Assignment (“drop box”), set up the grade center, open course for students, copy a course.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Blackboard Tests and Rubrics with Justin Frisque
Wednesday, April 24, 1:00 – 2:00 pm CST in R006

This session is for faculty. Learn how to create online tests using a variety of test questions. Learn how to create electronic rubrics you can attach to drop boxes and other assignments.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

Respondus LockDown Browser with Susan Gallanis
Friday, April 26, Noon – 1:00 pm in R006

This program is for faculty. Learn how to use Respondus LockDown Browser, a deterrent to cheating, for a test in Blackboard when the instructor is in the room during the test. When using LockDown Browser, students cannot print, make screen captures, access other web pages, or access other applications while taking the exam.

This session will be a F2F class, as well as a webinar streamed from the Mequon campus. You can join the webinar from your own computer using Zoom.

CELT Programs at CUW – January 2019

Getting Started with a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Project:
SoTL Working Lunch

Wednesday, January 9th 2019, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm in the Lakeshore Room

Are you looking for a scholarship project?
The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) is a path that will inform your teaching and expand your scholarship output.

Leaders: Angela Walmsley and Elizabeth Evans

Come as you are. Get started!
You get lunch! And a great book on SoTL.
No preparation needed other than an exercise of your curiosity. . bring a question you have about your students’ learning.
Bring your computer to get your ideas down on paper.

In this session you will learn about the steps in the SoTL process, identify a preliminary research question and study design, and set target dates for further steps. Follow-up support and/or touchpoints for each step can also be planned if participants are interested.

Concordia University Wisconsin Scholarship Boot Camp Winter 2019

Tuesday January 15 and Wednesday January 16, 2019 8am to 4:30pm

Come to a quiet place to work on your faculty scholarship projects, including your advanced study courses and dissertations. Sign up for the hours and days you plan to attend. Come as you are; arrive and leave as you need to.

Writing support, research design support and statistical planning and analysis support will be available for some part of each of the days.

The goal of this time is to produce tangible work. We provide the space, snacks, beverages, a lunch, and you supply the focus and attention to projects.

PH 039 will be the quiet space away from your phone and interruptions. The room will be open from 8am to 4:30 each day. You are encouraged to stay all day to get maximum benefit.

The last day to register for lunch (from the Landing) is Monday, January 14th at noon.

Sponsored by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs and supported by CELT
Please call Julie Dresen x2794 or Elizabeth Evans x4283 with questions.

January Blackboard Sessions

Blackboard Basics with Susan Gallanis
Tuesday January 8, 10:00 – 11:00 am in LU006

This session is for faculty. Learn how to log in and find your courses, add a folder, upload a document, create an Assignment (“drop box”), set up the grade center, open course for students, copy a course.

Respondus LockDown Browser with Susan Gallanis
Tuesday January 8, Noon – 1:00 pm in LU006

This program is for faculty. Learn how to use Respondus LockDown Browser, a deterrent to cheating, for a test in Blackboard when the instructor is in the room during the test. When using LockDown Browser, students cannot print, make screen captures, access other web pages, or access other applications while taking the exam.

Blackboard Tests and Rubrics with Justin Frisque
Friday January 11, 9:00 – 10:00 am in LU006

This session is for faculty. Learn how to create online tests using a variety of test questions. Learn how to create electronic rubrics you can attach to drop boxes and other assignments.

Respondus LockDown Browser with Justin Frisque
Friday January 11, 10:00 – 11:00 am in LU006

This program is for faculty. Learn how to use Respondus LockDown Browser, a deterrent to cheating, for a test in Blackboard when the instructor is in the room during the test. When using LockDown Browser, students cannot print, make screen captures, access other web pages, or access other applications while taking the exam.

Center Faculty Webinar – November 13, 2018

CELT facilitated this webinar that addressed the revised 6-week course schedule that takes effect January 1, 2019.

Materials shared:

Center Faculty Webinar PPT
Overview of changes to Center 6-week courses beginning 1/1/2019
Sample six week course calendar
Updated Language in AL Center Course Modules as of January 1
Open Blackboard course and set the date it opens for students
Provide audio or video feedback to student assignments
Student success reports in Blackboard

Link to view the webinar: https://us-lti.bbcollab.com/recording/87bec634e386417e9a32ce946bd52e35

Teaching Effective Professional Communication

On Wednesday, October 31, 2018 this year’s Faculty Laureate Carrie Jo Scheel (OT) presented “Teaching Effective Professional Communication”.

The program included sharing her expectations and evaluation of OT students’ oral and written communication while making presentations.This session is part of this year’s focus on Global Learning Outcome #5 Communicative Fluency.

Related handouts are below.

 

Presentation Powerpoint

Presentation Rubric